Extent of Pedigree Required to Screen for and Diagnose Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer: Comparison of Simplified and Extended Pedigrees

Yoonjung Heo, Min Hyun Kim, Duck Woo Kim, Sang A. Lee, Sukyung Bang, Myung Jo Kim, Heung Kwon Oh, Sung Bum Kang, Sung Il Kang, Ji Won Park, Seung Bum Ryoo, Seung Yong Jeong, Kyu Joo Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Obtaining an accurate pedigree is the first step in recognizing a patient with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome. However, lack of standardization of the degree of relationship included in the pedigrees generally limits obtaining a complete and/or accurate pedigree. DESIGN: This study analyzed the extent of pedigree required to screen for colorectal cancer and to diagnose Lynch syndrome. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers. PATIENTS: A detailed family history was obtained from patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer from 2003 to 2016. A simplified pedigree that included only first-degree relatives was obtained and compared with the extended pedigree. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The eligibility of the 2 pedigrees was assessed for each proband. The proportion of patients who would be missed using a simplified rather than an extended pedigree was calculated based on the American Cancer Society guidelines for recommending screening for colorectal cancer, on the revised Bethesda guidelines and the revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria for screening for hereditary colorectal cancer, and on the Amsterdam II criteria for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. RESULTS: The study examined 2015 families, including 41,826 individuals. Use of simplified and extended pedigrees was comparable in screening for colorectal cancer, with ratios of 183 of 185 (98.9%) for American Cancer Society guidelines, 295 of 295 (100%) for revised Bethesda guidelines, and 60 of 60 (100%) for revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria. However, the use of simplified pedigrees missed a definitive diagnosis of Lynch syndrome in 6 of 10 patients fulfilling Amsterdam II criteria based on extended pedigrees. The mean ages at diagnosis of the 4 probands included and the 6 missed using simplified pedigrees differed significantly (60.8 vs 38.2 y). LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by its recall bias, cross-sectional nature, lack of germline testing, and potential inapplicability to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: A simplified pedigree is acceptable for selecting candidates to screen for hereditary colorectal cancer, whereas an extended pedigree is still required for a more precise diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, especially in younger patients. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. EXTENSIÓN DE PEDIGREE REQUERIDO EN LA DETECCIÓN Y DIAGNÓSTICO DE CÁNCER COLORRECTAL HEREDITARIO SIN POLIPOSIS: COMPARACIÓN DE LOS PEDIGREES SIMPLIFICADO Y EL EXTENDIDO: La obtención de un Pedigree exacto es el primer paso para reconocer un paciente con cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis o síndrome de Lynch. Sin embargo, la falta de estandarización del grado de relación incluido en los Pedigrees generalmente limita la obtención de un Pedigree completo y / o preciso.Este estudio analizó el grado de Pedigree requerido para detectar el cáncer colorrectal y diagnosticar el síndrome de Lynch.Se obtuvo una historia familiar detallada de pacientes sometidos a cirugía por cáncer colorrectal desde 2003 hasta 2016. Se obtuvo también un Pedigree simplificado que incluía solo familiares de primer grado y se comparó con el Pedigree extendido.La elegibilidad de los dos Pedigrees se evaluó para cada sujeto de prueba (proband). La proporción de pacientes que se perderían usando un Pedigree simplificado en lugar de extendido se calculó en base a las guías de la Sociedad Americana del Cáncer y sus recomendaciones en la detección de cáncer colorrectal, en las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y en los criterios revisados de cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis para la detección hereditaria de cáncer colorrectal y según las normas de Amsterdam II para el diagnóstico del síndrome de Lynch.El estudio examinó a 2.015 familias, incluidas 41.826 personas. El uso de Pedigree simplificado y extendido fue comparable en la detección del cáncer colorrectal, con proporciones de 183/185 (98,9%) comparadas con las recomendaciones de la American Cancer Society, 295/295 (100%) para las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y 60/60 (100%) para los criterios revisados de sospecha de cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis. Sin embargo, el uso de Pedigree simplificado omitió un diagnóstico definitivo del síndrome de Lynch en 6 de diez pacientes que cumplían las normas de Amsterdam II basados en Pedigrees extendidos. Las edades medias al diagnóstico de los cuatro sujetos de prueba incluidos y los seis perdidos usando el Pedigree simplificado diferían significativamente (60.8 vs. 38.2 años).Un Pedigre simplificado es aceptable en la selección de candidatos para la detección de cáncer colorrectal hereditario, mientras que aún se requiere un Pedigree extendido para un diagnóstico más preciso de síndrome de Lynch, especialmente en pacientes más jóvenes. Consulte Video Resumen en http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. (Traducción-Dr. Edgar Xavier Delgadillo).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-159
Number of pages8
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2020

Fingerprint

Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Neoplasms
Pedigree
Colorectal Neoplasms
Guidelines

Cite this

@article{221efc814adc4f3ab7455280e960942d,
title = "Extent of Pedigree Required to Screen for and Diagnose Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer: Comparison of Simplified and Extended Pedigrees",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Obtaining an accurate pedigree is the first step in recognizing a patient with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome. However, lack of standardization of the degree of relationship included in the pedigrees generally limits obtaining a complete and/or accurate pedigree. DESIGN: This study analyzed the extent of pedigree required to screen for colorectal cancer and to diagnose Lynch syndrome. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers. PATIENTS: A detailed family history was obtained from patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer from 2003 to 2016. A simplified pedigree that included only first-degree relatives was obtained and compared with the extended pedigree. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The eligibility of the 2 pedigrees was assessed for each proband. The proportion of patients who would be missed using a simplified rather than an extended pedigree was calculated based on the American Cancer Society guidelines for recommending screening for colorectal cancer, on the revised Bethesda guidelines and the revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria for screening for hereditary colorectal cancer, and on the Amsterdam II criteria for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. RESULTS: The study examined 2015 families, including 41,826 individuals. Use of simplified and extended pedigrees was comparable in screening for colorectal cancer, with ratios of 183 of 185 (98.9{\%}) for American Cancer Society guidelines, 295 of 295 (100{\%}) for revised Bethesda guidelines, and 60 of 60 (100{\%}) for revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria. However, the use of simplified pedigrees missed a definitive diagnosis of Lynch syndrome in 6 of 10 patients fulfilling Amsterdam II criteria based on extended pedigrees. The mean ages at diagnosis of the 4 probands included and the 6 missed using simplified pedigrees differed significantly (60.8 vs 38.2 y). LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by its recall bias, cross-sectional nature, lack of germline testing, and potential inapplicability to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: A simplified pedigree is acceptable for selecting candidates to screen for hereditary colorectal cancer, whereas an extended pedigree is still required for a more precise diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, especially in younger patients. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. EXTENSI{\'O}N DE PEDIGREE REQUERIDO EN LA DETECCI{\'O}N Y DIAGN{\'O}STICO DE C{\'A}NCER COLORRECTAL HEREDITARIO SIN POLIPOSIS: COMPARACI{\'O}N DE LOS PEDIGREES SIMPLIFICADO Y EL EXTENDIDO: La obtenci{\'o}n de un Pedigree exacto es el primer paso para reconocer un paciente con c{\'a}ncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis o s{\'i}ndrome de Lynch. Sin embargo, la falta de estandarizaci{\'o}n del grado de relaci{\'o}n incluido en los Pedigrees generalmente limita la obtenci{\'o}n de un Pedigree completo y / o preciso.Este estudio analiz{\'o} el grado de Pedigree requerido para detectar el c{\'a}ncer colorrectal y diagnosticar el s{\'i}ndrome de Lynch.Se obtuvo una historia familiar detallada de pacientes sometidos a cirug{\'i}a por c{\'a}ncer colorrectal desde 2003 hasta 2016. Se obtuvo tambi{\'e}n un Pedigree simplificado que inclu{\'i}a solo familiares de primer grado y se compar{\'o} con el Pedigree extendido.La elegibilidad de los dos Pedigrees se evalu{\'o} para cada sujeto de prueba (proband). La proporci{\'o}n de pacientes que se perder{\'i}an usando un Pedigree simplificado en lugar de extendido se calcul{\'o} en base a las gu{\'i}as de la Sociedad Americana del C{\'a}ncer y sus recomendaciones en la detecci{\'o}n de c{\'a}ncer colorrectal, en las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y en los criterios revisados de c{\'a}ncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis para la detecci{\'o}n hereditaria de c{\'a}ncer colorrectal y seg{\'u}n las normas de Amsterdam II para el diagn{\'o}stico del s{\'i}ndrome de Lynch.El estudio examin{\'o} a 2.015 familias, incluidas 41.826 personas. El uso de Pedigree simplificado y extendido fue comparable en la detecci{\'o}n del c{\'a}ncer colorrectal, con proporciones de 183/185 (98,9{\%}) comparadas con las recomendaciones de la American Cancer Society, 295/295 (100{\%}) para las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y 60/60 (100{\%}) para los criterios revisados de sospecha de c{\'a}ncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis. Sin embargo, el uso de Pedigree simplificado omiti{\'o} un diagn{\'o}stico definitivo del s{\'i}ndrome de Lynch en 6 de diez pacientes que cumpl{\'i}an las normas de Amsterdam II basados en Pedigrees extendidos. Las edades medias al diagn{\'o}stico de los cuatro sujetos de prueba incluidos y los seis perdidos usando el Pedigree simplificado difer{\'i}an significativamente (60.8 vs. 38.2 a{\~n}os).Un Pedigre simplificado es aceptable en la selecci{\'o}n de candidatos para la detecci{\'o}n de c{\'a}ncer colorrectal hereditario, mientras que a{\'u}n se requiere un Pedigree extendido para un diagn{\'o}stico m{\'a}s preciso de s{\'i}ndrome de Lynch, especialmente en pacientes m{\'a}s j{\'o}venes. Consulte Video Resumen en http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. (Traducci{\'o}n-Dr. Edgar Xavier Delgadillo).",
author = "Yoonjung Heo and Kim, {Min Hyun} and Kim, {Duck Woo} and Lee, {Sang A.} and Sukyung Bang and Kim, {Myung Jo} and Oh, {Heung Kwon} and Kang, {Sung Bum} and Kang, {Sung Il} and Park, {Ji Won} and Ryoo, {Seung Bum} and Jeong, {Seung Yong} and Park, {Kyu Joo}",
year = "2020",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/DCR.0000000000001550",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "152--159",
journal = "Diseases of the colon and rectum",
issn = "0012-3706",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

Extent of Pedigree Required to Screen for and Diagnose Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer : Comparison of Simplified and Extended Pedigrees. / Heo, Yoonjung; Kim, Min Hyun; Kim, Duck Woo; Lee, Sang A.; Bang, Sukyung; Kim, Myung Jo; Oh, Heung Kwon; Kang, Sung Bum; Kang, Sung Il; Park, Ji Won; Ryoo, Seung Bum; Jeong, Seung Yong; Park, Kyu Joo.

In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.02.2020, p. 152-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extent of Pedigree Required to Screen for and Diagnose Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer

T2 - Comparison of Simplified and Extended Pedigrees

AU - Heo, Yoonjung

AU - Kim, Min Hyun

AU - Kim, Duck Woo

AU - Lee, Sang A.

AU - Bang, Sukyung

AU - Kim, Myung Jo

AU - Oh, Heung Kwon

AU - Kang, Sung Bum

AU - Kang, Sung Il

AU - Park, Ji Won

AU - Ryoo, Seung Bum

AU - Jeong, Seung Yong

AU - Park, Kyu Joo

PY - 2020/2/1

Y1 - 2020/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Obtaining an accurate pedigree is the first step in recognizing a patient with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome. However, lack of standardization of the degree of relationship included in the pedigrees generally limits obtaining a complete and/or accurate pedigree. DESIGN: This study analyzed the extent of pedigree required to screen for colorectal cancer and to diagnose Lynch syndrome. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers. PATIENTS: A detailed family history was obtained from patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer from 2003 to 2016. A simplified pedigree that included only first-degree relatives was obtained and compared with the extended pedigree. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The eligibility of the 2 pedigrees was assessed for each proband. The proportion of patients who would be missed using a simplified rather than an extended pedigree was calculated based on the American Cancer Society guidelines for recommending screening for colorectal cancer, on the revised Bethesda guidelines and the revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria for screening for hereditary colorectal cancer, and on the Amsterdam II criteria for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. RESULTS: The study examined 2015 families, including 41,826 individuals. Use of simplified and extended pedigrees was comparable in screening for colorectal cancer, with ratios of 183 of 185 (98.9%) for American Cancer Society guidelines, 295 of 295 (100%) for revised Bethesda guidelines, and 60 of 60 (100%) for revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria. However, the use of simplified pedigrees missed a definitive diagnosis of Lynch syndrome in 6 of 10 patients fulfilling Amsterdam II criteria based on extended pedigrees. The mean ages at diagnosis of the 4 probands included and the 6 missed using simplified pedigrees differed significantly (60.8 vs 38.2 y). LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by its recall bias, cross-sectional nature, lack of germline testing, and potential inapplicability to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: A simplified pedigree is acceptable for selecting candidates to screen for hereditary colorectal cancer, whereas an extended pedigree is still required for a more precise diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, especially in younger patients. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. EXTENSIÓN DE PEDIGREE REQUERIDO EN LA DETECCIÓN Y DIAGNÓSTICO DE CÁNCER COLORRECTAL HEREDITARIO SIN POLIPOSIS: COMPARACIÓN DE LOS PEDIGREES SIMPLIFICADO Y EL EXTENDIDO: La obtención de un Pedigree exacto es el primer paso para reconocer un paciente con cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis o síndrome de Lynch. Sin embargo, la falta de estandarización del grado de relación incluido en los Pedigrees generalmente limita la obtención de un Pedigree completo y / o preciso.Este estudio analizó el grado de Pedigree requerido para detectar el cáncer colorrectal y diagnosticar el síndrome de Lynch.Se obtuvo una historia familiar detallada de pacientes sometidos a cirugía por cáncer colorrectal desde 2003 hasta 2016. Se obtuvo también un Pedigree simplificado que incluía solo familiares de primer grado y se comparó con el Pedigree extendido.La elegibilidad de los dos Pedigrees se evaluó para cada sujeto de prueba (proband). La proporción de pacientes que se perderían usando un Pedigree simplificado en lugar de extendido se calculó en base a las guías de la Sociedad Americana del Cáncer y sus recomendaciones en la detección de cáncer colorrectal, en las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y en los criterios revisados de cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis para la detección hereditaria de cáncer colorrectal y según las normas de Amsterdam II para el diagnóstico del síndrome de Lynch.El estudio examinó a 2.015 familias, incluidas 41.826 personas. El uso de Pedigree simplificado y extendido fue comparable en la detección del cáncer colorrectal, con proporciones de 183/185 (98,9%) comparadas con las recomendaciones de la American Cancer Society, 295/295 (100%) para las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y 60/60 (100%) para los criterios revisados de sospecha de cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis. Sin embargo, el uso de Pedigree simplificado omitió un diagnóstico definitivo del síndrome de Lynch en 6 de diez pacientes que cumplían las normas de Amsterdam II basados en Pedigrees extendidos. Las edades medias al diagnóstico de los cuatro sujetos de prueba incluidos y los seis perdidos usando el Pedigree simplificado diferían significativamente (60.8 vs. 38.2 años).Un Pedigre simplificado es aceptable en la selección de candidatos para la detección de cáncer colorrectal hereditario, mientras que aún se requiere un Pedigree extendido para un diagnóstico más preciso de síndrome de Lynch, especialmente en pacientes más jóvenes. Consulte Video Resumen en http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. (Traducción-Dr. Edgar Xavier Delgadillo).

AB - BACKGROUND: Obtaining an accurate pedigree is the first step in recognizing a patient with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome. However, lack of standardization of the degree of relationship included in the pedigrees generally limits obtaining a complete and/or accurate pedigree. DESIGN: This study analyzed the extent of pedigree required to screen for colorectal cancer and to diagnose Lynch syndrome. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers. PATIENTS: A detailed family history was obtained from patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer from 2003 to 2016. A simplified pedigree that included only first-degree relatives was obtained and compared with the extended pedigree. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The eligibility of the 2 pedigrees was assessed for each proband. The proportion of patients who would be missed using a simplified rather than an extended pedigree was calculated based on the American Cancer Society guidelines for recommending screening for colorectal cancer, on the revised Bethesda guidelines and the revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria for screening for hereditary colorectal cancer, and on the Amsterdam II criteria for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. RESULTS: The study examined 2015 families, including 41,826 individuals. Use of simplified and extended pedigrees was comparable in screening for colorectal cancer, with ratios of 183 of 185 (98.9%) for American Cancer Society guidelines, 295 of 295 (100%) for revised Bethesda guidelines, and 60 of 60 (100%) for revised suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer criteria. However, the use of simplified pedigrees missed a definitive diagnosis of Lynch syndrome in 6 of 10 patients fulfilling Amsterdam II criteria based on extended pedigrees. The mean ages at diagnosis of the 4 probands included and the 6 missed using simplified pedigrees differed significantly (60.8 vs 38.2 y). LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by its recall bias, cross-sectional nature, lack of germline testing, and potential inapplicability to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: A simplified pedigree is acceptable for selecting candidates to screen for hereditary colorectal cancer, whereas an extended pedigree is still required for a more precise diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, especially in younger patients. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. EXTENSIÓN DE PEDIGREE REQUERIDO EN LA DETECCIÓN Y DIAGNÓSTICO DE CÁNCER COLORRECTAL HEREDITARIO SIN POLIPOSIS: COMPARACIÓN DE LOS PEDIGREES SIMPLIFICADO Y EL EXTENDIDO: La obtención de un Pedigree exacto es el primer paso para reconocer un paciente con cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis o síndrome de Lynch. Sin embargo, la falta de estandarización del grado de relación incluido en los Pedigrees generalmente limita la obtención de un Pedigree completo y / o preciso.Este estudio analizó el grado de Pedigree requerido para detectar el cáncer colorrectal y diagnosticar el síndrome de Lynch.Se obtuvo una historia familiar detallada de pacientes sometidos a cirugía por cáncer colorrectal desde 2003 hasta 2016. Se obtuvo también un Pedigree simplificado que incluía solo familiares de primer grado y se comparó con el Pedigree extendido.La elegibilidad de los dos Pedigrees se evaluó para cada sujeto de prueba (proband). La proporción de pacientes que se perderían usando un Pedigree simplificado en lugar de extendido se calculó en base a las guías de la Sociedad Americana del Cáncer y sus recomendaciones en la detección de cáncer colorrectal, en las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y en los criterios revisados de cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis para la detección hereditaria de cáncer colorrectal y según las normas de Amsterdam II para el diagnóstico del síndrome de Lynch.El estudio examinó a 2.015 familias, incluidas 41.826 personas. El uso de Pedigree simplificado y extendido fue comparable en la detección del cáncer colorrectal, con proporciones de 183/185 (98,9%) comparadas con las recomendaciones de la American Cancer Society, 295/295 (100%) para las pautas revisadas de Bethesda y 60/60 (100%) para los criterios revisados de sospecha de cáncer colorrectal hereditario sin poliposis. Sin embargo, el uso de Pedigree simplificado omitió un diagnóstico definitivo del síndrome de Lynch en 6 de diez pacientes que cumplían las normas de Amsterdam II basados en Pedigrees extendidos. Las edades medias al diagnóstico de los cuatro sujetos de prueba incluidos y los seis perdidos usando el Pedigree simplificado diferían significativamente (60.8 vs. 38.2 años).Un Pedigre simplificado es aceptable en la selección de candidatos para la detección de cáncer colorrectal hereditario, mientras que aún se requiere un Pedigree extendido para un diagnóstico más preciso de síndrome de Lynch, especialmente en pacientes más jóvenes. Consulte Video Resumen en http://links.lww.com/DCR/B97. (Traducción-Dr. Edgar Xavier Delgadillo).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85077761565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/DCR.0000000000001550

DO - 10.1097/DCR.0000000000001550

M3 - Article

C2 - 31842160

AN - SCOPUS:85077761565

VL - 63

SP - 152

EP - 159

JO - Diseases of the colon and rectum

JF - Diseases of the colon and rectum

SN - 0012-3706

IS - 2

ER -