Estimation of thermal sensation based on wrist skin temperatures

Soo Young Sim, Myung Jun Koh, Kwang Min Joo, Seungwoo Noh, Sangyun Park, Youn Ho Kim, Kwangsuk Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number420
JournalSensors (Switzerland)
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2016

Fingerprint

wrist
Skin Temperature
Wrist
Skin
Hot Temperature
root-mean-square errors
Temperature
temperature
Mean square error
arteries
Ulnar Artery
Radial Artery
thermal comfort
thermal environments
Thermal comfort
Intelligent control
Healthy Volunteers
correlation coefficients
Thermal gradients
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Thermal comfort
  • Thermal sensation
  • Wearable device
  • Wrist skin temperature

Cite this

Sim, S. Y., Koh, M. J., Joo, K. M., Noh, S., Park, S., Kim, Y. H., & Park, K. (2016). Estimation of thermal sensation based on wrist skin temperatures. Sensors (Switzerland), 16(4), [420]. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16040420
Sim, Soo Young ; Koh, Myung Jun ; Joo, Kwang Min ; Noh, Seungwoo ; Park, Sangyun ; Kim, Youn Ho ; Park, Kwangsuk. / Estimation of thermal sensation based on wrist skin temperatures. In: Sensors (Switzerland). 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 4.
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Estimation of thermal sensation based on wrist skin temperatures. / Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwangsuk.

In: Sensors (Switzerland), Vol. 16, No. 4, 420, 01.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Sim SY, Koh MJ, Joo KM, Noh S, Park S, Kim YH et al. Estimation of thermal sensation based on wrist skin temperatures. Sensors (Switzerland). 2016 Apr 1;16(4). 420. https://doi.org/10.3390/s16040420