Endovascular coil embolization of 435 small asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms: Procedural morbidity and patient outcome

S. H. Im, M. H. Han, O-Ki Kwon, B. J. Kwon, S. H. Kim, Jeong Eun Kim, Chang Wan Oh

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Whether treatment of small asymptomatic aneurysms is appropriate or not remains controversial. We performed a retrospective study on the procedural morbidity and mortality of coil embolization of small asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) to obtain a more generalized estimate of procedural risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 435 small (maximum diameter ≤7 mm) asymptomatic UIAs in 370 patients were treated by coil embolization. Aneurysm sizes were determined by using 3D angiograms. We assessed procedure-related morbidity and mortality, immediate postprocedural angiographic results, short-term imaging follow-up results, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Initial aneurysm occlusion was complete in 334 aneurysms, near complete in 78, and incomplete in 22. One internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm that ruptured during the procedure was treated with parent artery occlusion. Two hundred wide-neck aneurysms were coiled with the aid of various neck-remodeling techniques. The 44 procedure-related complications were the following: 24 thromboembolisms, 11 coil protrusions or prolapses into the parent vessel, 4 intraprocedural ruptures, 3 device-related complications, and 2 femoral-access complications. We had a total of 44 (10.1%) procedure-related complications with only 1 leading to persistent neurologic deficit. Procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality were 0.27% (1/370) and 0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of small unruptured asymptomatic aneurysms, endovascular treatment was achieved with good short-term angiographic outcome and low permanent neurologic impairment. The goal of this study was not to provide a conclusion about treatment guidelines for small UIA but rather to help guide future recommendations by presenting a more generalized estimate of endovascular treatment risk than is currently available.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2009

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Intracranial Aneurysm
Aneurysm
Morbidity
Mortality
Neck
Ruptured Aneurysm
Prolapse
Thromboembolism
Internal Carotid Artery
Therapeutics
Neurologic Manifestations
Thigh
Nervous System
Rupture
Angiography
Retrospective Studies
Arteries
Guidelines
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

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title = "Endovascular coil embolization of 435 small asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms: Procedural morbidity and patient outcome",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Whether treatment of small asymptomatic aneurysms is appropriate or not remains controversial. We performed a retrospective study on the procedural morbidity and mortality of coil embolization of small asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) to obtain a more generalized estimate of procedural risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 435 small (maximum diameter ≤7 mm) asymptomatic UIAs in 370 patients were treated by coil embolization. Aneurysm sizes were determined by using 3D angiograms. We assessed procedure-related morbidity and mortality, immediate postprocedural angiographic results, short-term imaging follow-up results, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Initial aneurysm occlusion was complete in 334 aneurysms, near complete in 78, and incomplete in 22. One internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm that ruptured during the procedure was treated with parent artery occlusion. Two hundred wide-neck aneurysms were coiled with the aid of various neck-remodeling techniques. The 44 procedure-related complications were the following: 24 thromboembolisms, 11 coil protrusions or prolapses into the parent vessel, 4 intraprocedural ruptures, 3 device-related complications, and 2 femoral-access complications. We had a total of 44 (10.1{\%}) procedure-related complications with only 1 leading to persistent neurologic deficit. Procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality were 0.27{\%} (1/370) and 0{\%}, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of small unruptured asymptomatic aneurysms, endovascular treatment was achieved with good short-term angiographic outcome and low permanent neurologic impairment. The goal of this study was not to provide a conclusion about treatment guidelines for small UIA but rather to help guide future recommendations by presenting a more generalized estimate of endovascular treatment risk than is currently available.",
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Endovascular coil embolization of 435 small asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms : Procedural morbidity and patient outcome. / Im, S. H.; Han, M. H.; Kwon, O-Ki; Kwon, B. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Jeong Eun; Oh, Chang Wan.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 79-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Im, S. H.

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AU - Kwon, B. J.

AU - Kim, S. H.

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AU - Oh, Chang Wan

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N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Whether treatment of small asymptomatic aneurysms is appropriate or not remains controversial. We performed a retrospective study on the procedural morbidity and mortality of coil embolization of small asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) to obtain a more generalized estimate of procedural risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 435 small (maximum diameter ≤7 mm) asymptomatic UIAs in 370 patients were treated by coil embolization. Aneurysm sizes were determined by using 3D angiograms. We assessed procedure-related morbidity and mortality, immediate postprocedural angiographic results, short-term imaging follow-up results, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Initial aneurysm occlusion was complete in 334 aneurysms, near complete in 78, and incomplete in 22. One internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm that ruptured during the procedure was treated with parent artery occlusion. Two hundred wide-neck aneurysms were coiled with the aid of various neck-remodeling techniques. The 44 procedure-related complications were the following: 24 thromboembolisms, 11 coil protrusions or prolapses into the parent vessel, 4 intraprocedural ruptures, 3 device-related complications, and 2 femoral-access complications. We had a total of 44 (10.1%) procedure-related complications with only 1 leading to persistent neurologic deficit. Procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality were 0.27% (1/370) and 0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of small unruptured asymptomatic aneurysms, endovascular treatment was achieved with good short-term angiographic outcome and low permanent neurologic impairment. The goal of this study was not to provide a conclusion about treatment guidelines for small UIA but rather to help guide future recommendations by presenting a more generalized estimate of endovascular treatment risk than is currently available.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Whether treatment of small asymptomatic aneurysms is appropriate or not remains controversial. We performed a retrospective study on the procedural morbidity and mortality of coil embolization of small asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) to obtain a more generalized estimate of procedural risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 435 small (maximum diameter ≤7 mm) asymptomatic UIAs in 370 patients were treated by coil embolization. Aneurysm sizes were determined by using 3D angiograms. We assessed procedure-related morbidity and mortality, immediate postprocedural angiographic results, short-term imaging follow-up results, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Initial aneurysm occlusion was complete in 334 aneurysms, near complete in 78, and incomplete in 22. One internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm that ruptured during the procedure was treated with parent artery occlusion. Two hundred wide-neck aneurysms were coiled with the aid of various neck-remodeling techniques. The 44 procedure-related complications were the following: 24 thromboembolisms, 11 coil protrusions or prolapses into the parent vessel, 4 intraprocedural ruptures, 3 device-related complications, and 2 femoral-access complications. We had a total of 44 (10.1%) procedure-related complications with only 1 leading to persistent neurologic deficit. Procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality were 0.27% (1/370) and 0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of small unruptured asymptomatic aneurysms, endovascular treatment was achieved with good short-term angiographic outcome and low permanent neurologic impairment. The goal of this study was not to provide a conclusion about treatment guidelines for small UIA but rather to help guide future recommendations by presenting a more generalized estimate of endovascular treatment risk than is currently available.

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