Effect of vitamin E in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with metabolic syndrome: A propensity score-matched cohort study

Gi Hyun Kim, Jung Wha Chung, Jong Ho Lee, Kyeong Sam Ok, Eun Sun Jang, Jai Hwan Kim, Cheol Min Shin, Young Su Park, Jin-Hyeok Hwang, Sook-Hyang Jeong, Nayoung Kim, Dong Ho Lee, Jin Wook Kim

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Vitamin E improves the biochemical profiles and liver histology in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but the role of vitamin E is not clearly defined in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which includes both simple steatosis and steatohepatitis. Co-morbid metabolic syndrome increases the probability of steatohepatitis in NAFLD. In this study, we aimed to determine the short-term effects of vitamin E and off-treatment durability of response in a propensity-score matched cohort of NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome.

METHODS: A retrospective cohort was constructed by retrieving 526 consecutive NAFLD patients from the electronic medical record data warehouse of a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Among them, 335 patients (63.7%) had metabolic syndrome and were eligible for vitamin E therapy. In order to assess the effect of vitamin E, propensity score matching was used by matching covariates between control patients (n=250) and patients who received vitamin E (n=85).

RESULTS: The PS-matched vitamin E group (n=58) and control group (n=58) exhibited similar baseline metabolic profiles. After 6 months of vitamin E therapy, the mean ALT levels decreased significantly compared to PS-matched control (P<0.01). The changes in metabolic profiles (body weight, lipid and glucose levels) did not differ between control and vitamin E groups during the study period.

CONCLUSIONS: Short-term vitamin E treatment significantly reduces ALT levels in NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome, but metabolic profiles are not affected by vitamin E.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-386
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Molecular Hepatology
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2015

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Propensity Score
Vitamin E
Cohort Studies
Metabolome
Fatty Liver
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Republic of Korea
Electronic Health Records
Tertiary Care Centers
Histology
Body Weight

Keywords

  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Propensity score
  • Vitamin E

Cite this

@article{db5a5a451dfe4be69d2d41b59f470a74,
title = "Effect of vitamin E in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with metabolic syndrome: A propensity score-matched cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/AIMS: Vitamin E improves the biochemical profiles and liver histology in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but the role of vitamin E is not clearly defined in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which includes both simple steatosis and steatohepatitis. Co-morbid metabolic syndrome increases the probability of steatohepatitis in NAFLD. In this study, we aimed to determine the short-term effects of vitamin E and off-treatment durability of response in a propensity-score matched cohort of NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome.METHODS: A retrospective cohort was constructed by retrieving 526 consecutive NAFLD patients from the electronic medical record data warehouse of a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Among them, 335 patients (63.7{\%}) had metabolic syndrome and were eligible for vitamin E therapy. In order to assess the effect of vitamin E, propensity score matching was used by matching covariates between control patients (n=250) and patients who received vitamin E (n=85).RESULTS: The PS-matched vitamin E group (n=58) and control group (n=58) exhibited similar baseline metabolic profiles. After 6 months of vitamin E therapy, the mean ALT levels decreased significantly compared to PS-matched control (P<0.01). The changes in metabolic profiles (body weight, lipid and glucose levels) did not differ between control and vitamin E groups during the study period.CONCLUSIONS: Short-term vitamin E treatment significantly reduces ALT levels in NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome, but metabolic profiles are not affected by vitamin E.",
keywords = "Metabolic syndrome, Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, Propensity score, Vitamin E",
author = "Kim, {Gi Hyun} and Chung, {Jung Wha} and Lee, {Jong Ho} and Ok, {Kyeong Sam} and Jang, {Eun Sun} and Kim, {Jai Hwan} and Shin, {Cheol Min} and Park, {Young Su} and Jin-Hyeok Hwang and Sook-Hyang Jeong and Nayoung Kim and Lee, {Dong Ho} and Kim, {Jin Wook}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3350/cmh.2015.21.4.379",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "379--386",
journal = "Clinical and molecular hepatology",
issn = "2287-2728",
publisher = "Korean Association for the Study of the Liver",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of vitamin E in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with metabolic syndrome

T2 - A propensity score-matched cohort study

AU - Kim, Gi Hyun

AU - Chung, Jung Wha

AU - Lee, Jong Ho

AU - Ok, Kyeong Sam

AU - Jang, Eun Sun

AU - Kim, Jai Hwan

AU - Shin, Cheol Min

AU - Park, Young Su

AU - Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

AU - Jeong, Sook-Hyang

AU - Kim, Nayoung

AU - Lee, Dong Ho

AU - Kim, Jin Wook

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Vitamin E improves the biochemical profiles and liver histology in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but the role of vitamin E is not clearly defined in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which includes both simple steatosis and steatohepatitis. Co-morbid metabolic syndrome increases the probability of steatohepatitis in NAFLD. In this study, we aimed to determine the short-term effects of vitamin E and off-treatment durability of response in a propensity-score matched cohort of NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome.METHODS: A retrospective cohort was constructed by retrieving 526 consecutive NAFLD patients from the electronic medical record data warehouse of a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Among them, 335 patients (63.7%) had metabolic syndrome and were eligible for vitamin E therapy. In order to assess the effect of vitamin E, propensity score matching was used by matching covariates between control patients (n=250) and patients who received vitamin E (n=85).RESULTS: The PS-matched vitamin E group (n=58) and control group (n=58) exhibited similar baseline metabolic profiles. After 6 months of vitamin E therapy, the mean ALT levels decreased significantly compared to PS-matched control (P<0.01). The changes in metabolic profiles (body weight, lipid and glucose levels) did not differ between control and vitamin E groups during the study period.CONCLUSIONS: Short-term vitamin E treatment significantly reduces ALT levels in NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome, but metabolic profiles are not affected by vitamin E.

AB - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Vitamin E improves the biochemical profiles and liver histology in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but the role of vitamin E is not clearly defined in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which includes both simple steatosis and steatohepatitis. Co-morbid metabolic syndrome increases the probability of steatohepatitis in NAFLD. In this study, we aimed to determine the short-term effects of vitamin E and off-treatment durability of response in a propensity-score matched cohort of NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome.METHODS: A retrospective cohort was constructed by retrieving 526 consecutive NAFLD patients from the electronic medical record data warehouse of a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Among them, 335 patients (63.7%) had metabolic syndrome and were eligible for vitamin E therapy. In order to assess the effect of vitamin E, propensity score matching was used by matching covariates between control patients (n=250) and patients who received vitamin E (n=85).RESULTS: The PS-matched vitamin E group (n=58) and control group (n=58) exhibited similar baseline metabolic profiles. After 6 months of vitamin E therapy, the mean ALT levels decreased significantly compared to PS-matched control (P<0.01). The changes in metabolic profiles (body weight, lipid and glucose levels) did not differ between control and vitamin E groups during the study period.CONCLUSIONS: Short-term vitamin E treatment significantly reduces ALT levels in NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome, but metabolic profiles are not affected by vitamin E.

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

KW - Propensity score

KW - Vitamin E

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U2 - 10.3350/cmh.2015.21.4.379

DO - 10.3350/cmh.2015.21.4.379

M3 - Article

C2 - 26770927

AN - SCOPUS:85050578447

VL - 21

SP - 379

EP - 386

JO - Clinical and molecular hepatology

JF - Clinical and molecular hepatology

SN - 2287-2728

IS - 4

ER -