Effect of red, processed, and white meat consumption on the risk of gastric cancer

An overall and dose-response meta-analysis

Seong Rae Kim, Kyuwoong Kim, Sang Ah Lee, Sung Ok Kwon, Jong-Koo Lee, Nana Keum, Sangmin Park

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Whether the risk of gastric cancer varies by the types of meat consumption still remains disputable. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify the exact associations that red, processed, and white meat have with gastric cancer. We searched relevant studies in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library before November 2018, including cohort and case-control studies. We used random-effect models to estimate the adjusted relative risk (RR), and Egger’s tests to evaluate publication bias. Through stepwise screening, 43 studies were included in this analysis (11 cohort studies and 32 case-control studies with 16,572 cases). In a meta-analysis for the highest versus lowest categories of meat consumption, both red (RR: 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21-1.66) and processed (RR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.37-1.81) meat consumption were positively associated with gastric cancer risk, while white meat consumption was negatively associated with gastric cancer risk (RR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.69-0.92). In a dose-response meta-analysis, the RRs of gastric cancer were 1.26 (95% CI: 1.11-1.42) for every 100 g/day increment in red meat consumption, 1.72 (95% CI: 1.36-2.18) for every 50 g/day increment in processed meat consumption, and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.64-1.15) for every 100 g/day increment in white meat consumption. The increase of white meat consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer, while red or processed meat may increase the risk of gastric cancer. Further studies are required to identify these associations, especially between white meat and gastric cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Article number826
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

meat consumption
stomach neoplasms
meta-analysis
Meat
Stomach Neoplasms
dose response
Meta-Analysis
confidence interval
relative risk
Confidence Intervals
red meat
case-control studies
meat
Case-Control Studies
Publication Bias
cohort studies
Libraries
screening
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • Cancer epidemiology
  • Gastric cancer
  • Processed meat
  • Red meat
  • White meat

Cite this

@article{7e89222dd10f4d62bc9fa6535a36a0bc,
title = "Effect of red, processed, and white meat consumption on the risk of gastric cancer: An overall and dose-response meta-analysis",
abstract = "Whether the risk of gastric cancer varies by the types of meat consumption still remains disputable. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify the exact associations that red, processed, and white meat have with gastric cancer. We searched relevant studies in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library before November 2018, including cohort and case-control studies. We used random-effect models to estimate the adjusted relative risk (RR), and Egger’s tests to evaluate publication bias. Through stepwise screening, 43 studies were included in this analysis (11 cohort studies and 32 case-control studies with 16,572 cases). In a meta-analysis for the highest versus lowest categories of meat consumption, both red (RR: 1.41, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.21-1.66) and processed (RR: 1.57, 95{\%} CI: 1.37-1.81) meat consumption were positively associated with gastric cancer risk, while white meat consumption was negatively associated with gastric cancer risk (RR: 0.80, 95{\%} CI: 0.69-0.92). In a dose-response meta-analysis, the RRs of gastric cancer were 1.26 (95{\%} CI: 1.11-1.42) for every 100 g/day increment in red meat consumption, 1.72 (95{\%} CI: 1.36-2.18) for every 50 g/day increment in processed meat consumption, and 0.86 (95{\%} CI: 0.64-1.15) for every 100 g/day increment in white meat consumption. The increase of white meat consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer, while red or processed meat may increase the risk of gastric cancer. Further studies are required to identify these associations, especially between white meat and gastric cancer.",
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Effect of red, processed, and white meat consumption on the risk of gastric cancer : An overall and dose-response meta-analysis. / Kim, Seong Rae; Kim, Kyuwoong; Lee, Sang Ah; Kwon, Sung Ok; Lee, Jong-Koo; Keum, Nana; Park, Sangmin.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 4, 826, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Effect of red, processed, and white meat consumption on the risk of gastric cancer

T2 - An overall and dose-response meta-analysis

AU - Kim, Seong Rae

AU - Kim, Kyuwoong

AU - Lee, Sang Ah

AU - Kwon, Sung Ok

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AU - Keum, Nana

AU - Park, Sangmin

PY - 2019/4/1

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N2 - Whether the risk of gastric cancer varies by the types of meat consumption still remains disputable. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify the exact associations that red, processed, and white meat have with gastric cancer. We searched relevant studies in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library before November 2018, including cohort and case-control studies. We used random-effect models to estimate the adjusted relative risk (RR), and Egger’s tests to evaluate publication bias. Through stepwise screening, 43 studies were included in this analysis (11 cohort studies and 32 case-control studies with 16,572 cases). In a meta-analysis for the highest versus lowest categories of meat consumption, both red (RR: 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21-1.66) and processed (RR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.37-1.81) meat consumption were positively associated with gastric cancer risk, while white meat consumption was negatively associated with gastric cancer risk (RR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.69-0.92). In a dose-response meta-analysis, the RRs of gastric cancer were 1.26 (95% CI: 1.11-1.42) for every 100 g/day increment in red meat consumption, 1.72 (95% CI: 1.36-2.18) for every 50 g/day increment in processed meat consumption, and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.64-1.15) for every 100 g/day increment in white meat consumption. The increase of white meat consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer, while red or processed meat may increase the risk of gastric cancer. Further studies are required to identify these associations, especially between white meat and gastric cancer.

AB - Whether the risk of gastric cancer varies by the types of meat consumption still remains disputable. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify the exact associations that red, processed, and white meat have with gastric cancer. We searched relevant studies in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library before November 2018, including cohort and case-control studies. We used random-effect models to estimate the adjusted relative risk (RR), and Egger’s tests to evaluate publication bias. Through stepwise screening, 43 studies were included in this analysis (11 cohort studies and 32 case-control studies with 16,572 cases). In a meta-analysis for the highest versus lowest categories of meat consumption, both red (RR: 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21-1.66) and processed (RR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.37-1.81) meat consumption were positively associated with gastric cancer risk, while white meat consumption was negatively associated with gastric cancer risk (RR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.69-0.92). In a dose-response meta-analysis, the RRs of gastric cancer were 1.26 (95% CI: 1.11-1.42) for every 100 g/day increment in red meat consumption, 1.72 (95% CI: 1.36-2.18) for every 50 g/day increment in processed meat consumption, and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.64-1.15) for every 100 g/day increment in white meat consumption. The increase of white meat consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer, while red or processed meat may increase the risk of gastric cancer. Further studies are required to identify these associations, especially between white meat and gastric cancer.

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KW - Processed meat

KW - Red meat

KW - White meat

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