Effect of prewarming during induction of anesthesia on microvascular reactivity in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: A randomized clinical trial

Youn Joung Cho, Seo Yun Lee, Tae Kyong Kim, Deok Man Hong, Yunseok Jeon

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: General anesthesia may induce inadvertent hypothermia and this may be related to perioperative cardiovascular complications. Microvascular reactivity, measured by the recovery slope during a vascular occlusion test, is decreased during surgery and is also related to postoperative clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that microvascular changes during surgery may be related to intraoperative hypothermia. To evaluate this, we conducted a randomized study in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, in which the effect of prewarming on microvascular reactivity was evaluated. Methods: Patients scheduled for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were screened. Enrolled patients were randomized to the prewarming group to receive forced-air warming during induction of anesthesia or to the control group. Measurement of core and skin temperatures and vascular occlusion test were conducted before anesthesia induction, 1, 2, and 3 h after induction, and at the end of surgery. Results: In total, 40 patients were enrolled and finished the study (n = 20 in the prewarming group and n = 20 in the control group). During the first 3 h of anesthesia, core temperature was higher in the prewarming group than the control group (p < 0.001). The number of patients developing hypothermia was lower in the prewarming group than the control group (4/20 vs. 13/20, p = 0.004). However, tissue oxygen saturation and changes in recovery slope following a vascular occlusion test at 3 h after anesthesia induction did not differ between the groups. There was no difference in clinical outcome, including perioperative transfusion, wound infection, or hospital stay, between the groups. Conclusions: Prewarming during induction of anesthesia decreased intraoperative hypothermia, but did not reduce the deterioration in microvascular reactivity in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02186210.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0159772
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2016

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Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass
randomized clinical trials
coronary vessels
Hypothermia
Coronary Artery Bypass
pumps
Surgery
anesthesia
Anesthesia
Randomized Controlled Trials
surgery
hypothermia
Pumps
blood vessels
Blood Vessels
Control Groups
Recovery
skin temperature
Skin Temperature
testing

Cite this

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title = "Effect of prewarming during induction of anesthesia on microvascular reactivity in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: A randomized clinical trial",
abstract = "Background: General anesthesia may induce inadvertent hypothermia and this may be related to perioperative cardiovascular complications. Microvascular reactivity, measured by the recovery slope during a vascular occlusion test, is decreased during surgery and is also related to postoperative clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that microvascular changes during surgery may be related to intraoperative hypothermia. To evaluate this, we conducted a randomized study in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, in which the effect of prewarming on microvascular reactivity was evaluated. Methods: Patients scheduled for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were screened. Enrolled patients were randomized to the prewarming group to receive forced-air warming during induction of anesthesia or to the control group. Measurement of core and skin temperatures and vascular occlusion test were conducted before anesthesia induction, 1, 2, and 3 h after induction, and at the end of surgery. Results: In total, 40 patients were enrolled and finished the study (n = 20 in the prewarming group and n = 20 in the control group). During the first 3 h of anesthesia, core temperature was higher in the prewarming group than the control group (p < 0.001). The number of patients developing hypothermia was lower in the prewarming group than the control group (4/20 vs. 13/20, p = 0.004). However, tissue oxygen saturation and changes in recovery slope following a vascular occlusion test at 3 h after anesthesia induction did not differ between the groups. There was no difference in clinical outcome, including perioperative transfusion, wound infection, or hospital stay, between the groups. Conclusions: Prewarming during induction of anesthesia decreased intraoperative hypothermia, but did not reduce the deterioration in microvascular reactivity in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02186210.",
author = "Cho, {Youn Joung} and Lee, {Seo Yun} and Kim, {Tae Kyong} and Hong, {Deok Man} and Yunseok Jeon",
year = "2016",
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T1 - Effect of prewarming during induction of anesthesia on microvascular reactivity in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

T2 - A randomized clinical trial

AU - Cho, Youn Joung

AU - Lee, Seo Yun

AU - Kim, Tae Kyong

AU - Hong, Deok Man

AU - Jeon, Yunseok

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - Background: General anesthesia may induce inadvertent hypothermia and this may be related to perioperative cardiovascular complications. Microvascular reactivity, measured by the recovery slope during a vascular occlusion test, is decreased during surgery and is also related to postoperative clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that microvascular changes during surgery may be related to intraoperative hypothermia. To evaluate this, we conducted a randomized study in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, in which the effect of prewarming on microvascular reactivity was evaluated. Methods: Patients scheduled for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were screened. Enrolled patients were randomized to the prewarming group to receive forced-air warming during induction of anesthesia or to the control group. Measurement of core and skin temperatures and vascular occlusion test were conducted before anesthesia induction, 1, 2, and 3 h after induction, and at the end of surgery. Results: In total, 40 patients were enrolled and finished the study (n = 20 in the prewarming group and n = 20 in the control group). During the first 3 h of anesthesia, core temperature was higher in the prewarming group than the control group (p < 0.001). The number of patients developing hypothermia was lower in the prewarming group than the control group (4/20 vs. 13/20, p = 0.004). However, tissue oxygen saturation and changes in recovery slope following a vascular occlusion test at 3 h after anesthesia induction did not differ between the groups. There was no difference in clinical outcome, including perioperative transfusion, wound infection, or hospital stay, between the groups. Conclusions: Prewarming during induction of anesthesia decreased intraoperative hypothermia, but did not reduce the deterioration in microvascular reactivity in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02186210.

AB - Background: General anesthesia may induce inadvertent hypothermia and this may be related to perioperative cardiovascular complications. Microvascular reactivity, measured by the recovery slope during a vascular occlusion test, is decreased during surgery and is also related to postoperative clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that microvascular changes during surgery may be related to intraoperative hypothermia. To evaluate this, we conducted a randomized study in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, in which the effect of prewarming on microvascular reactivity was evaluated. Methods: Patients scheduled for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were screened. Enrolled patients were randomized to the prewarming group to receive forced-air warming during induction of anesthesia or to the control group. Measurement of core and skin temperatures and vascular occlusion test were conducted before anesthesia induction, 1, 2, and 3 h after induction, and at the end of surgery. Results: In total, 40 patients were enrolled and finished the study (n = 20 in the prewarming group and n = 20 in the control group). During the first 3 h of anesthesia, core temperature was higher in the prewarming group than the control group (p < 0.001). The number of patients developing hypothermia was lower in the prewarming group than the control group (4/20 vs. 13/20, p = 0.004). However, tissue oxygen saturation and changes in recovery slope following a vascular occlusion test at 3 h after anesthesia induction did not differ between the groups. There was no difference in clinical outcome, including perioperative transfusion, wound infection, or hospital stay, between the groups. Conclusions: Prewarming during induction of anesthesia decreased intraoperative hypothermia, but did not reduce the deterioration in microvascular reactivity in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02186210.

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