Disparate Trends in Mortality of Etiology-Specific Chronic Liver Diseases Among Hispanic Subpopulations

Donghee Kim, Andrew A. Li, Ryan B. Perumpail, George Cholankeril, Stevan A. Gonzalez, Won Kim, Aijaz Ahmed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background & Aims: Little is known about trends in mortality among Hispanic subpopulations and etiologies of chronic liver disease (CLD). We investigated trends in mortality of CLD among the 3 largest Hispanic subgroups based on origin (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans) in the United States (US) from 2007 to 2016. Methods: We collected data from the US Census and national mortality database, calculated age-standardized mortalities for CLD among Hispanic subgroups, and compared these with non-Hispanic whites. We determined mortality rate patterns by joinpoint analysis with estimates of annual percentage change. Results: Hispanics were relatively younger with a lower likelihood of high school education than non-Hispanic whites at time of death. Puerto Ricans had the highest rates of age-standardized hepatitis C virus-related mortality in 2016, followed by non-Hispanic whites, Mexicans, and Cubans. Age-standardized mortality rates associated with hepatitis B virus infection decreased steadily among all subjects. Age-standardized mortality rates from alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among non-Hispanic whites and all Hispanics increased and accelerated. Mexicans had the highest rates of age-standardized alcoholic liver disease-related mortality, followed by non-Hispanic whites, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans. Cirrhosis- and hepatocellular carcinoma-related mortality rates increased steadily from 2007 to 2016, with the highest among Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites and Mexicans, and lowest in Cubans. Conclusions: We found high levels of heterogeneity in CLD-related mortality patterns among the 3 largest Hispanic subgroups. Therefore, combining Hispanics as an aggregate group obscures potentially meaningful heterogeneity in etiology-specific CLD-related mortality rates among Hispanic subgroups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1607-1615.e2
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Liver Diseases
Chronic Disease
Mortality
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Censuses
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Fibrosis
Databases
Education

Keywords

  • ALD
  • End-Stage Liver Disease
  • HBV
  • HCV
  • Latino
  • National Vital Statistic System

Cite this

Kim, Donghee ; Li, Andrew A. ; Perumpail, Ryan B. ; Cholankeril, George ; Gonzalez, Stevan A. ; Kim, Won ; Ahmed, Aijaz. / Disparate Trends in Mortality of Etiology-Specific Chronic Liver Diseases Among Hispanic Subpopulations. In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2019 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 1607-1615.e2.
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abstract = "Background & Aims: Little is known about trends in mortality among Hispanic subpopulations and etiologies of chronic liver disease (CLD). We investigated trends in mortality of CLD among the 3 largest Hispanic subgroups based on origin (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans) in the United States (US) from 2007 to 2016. Methods: We collected data from the US Census and national mortality database, calculated age-standardized mortalities for CLD among Hispanic subgroups, and compared these with non-Hispanic whites. We determined mortality rate patterns by joinpoint analysis with estimates of annual percentage change. Results: Hispanics were relatively younger with a lower likelihood of high school education than non-Hispanic whites at time of death. Puerto Ricans had the highest rates of age-standardized hepatitis C virus-related mortality in 2016, followed by non-Hispanic whites, Mexicans, and Cubans. Age-standardized mortality rates associated with hepatitis B virus infection decreased steadily among all subjects. Age-standardized mortality rates from alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among non-Hispanic whites and all Hispanics increased and accelerated. Mexicans had the highest rates of age-standardized alcoholic liver disease-related mortality, followed by non-Hispanic whites, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans. Cirrhosis- and hepatocellular carcinoma-related mortality rates increased steadily from 2007 to 2016, with the highest among Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites and Mexicans, and lowest in Cubans. Conclusions: We found high levels of heterogeneity in CLD-related mortality patterns among the 3 largest Hispanic subgroups. Therefore, combining Hispanics as an aggregate group obscures potentially meaningful heterogeneity in etiology-specific CLD-related mortality rates among Hispanic subgroups.",
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Disparate Trends in Mortality of Etiology-Specific Chronic Liver Diseases Among Hispanic Subpopulations. / Kim, Donghee; Li, Andrew A.; Perumpail, Ryan B.; Cholankeril, George; Gonzalez, Stevan A.; Kim, Won; Ahmed, Aijaz.

In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 17, No. 8, 01.07.2019, p. 1607-1615.e2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Kim, Donghee

AU - Li, Andrew A.

AU - Perumpail, Ryan B.

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AU - Gonzalez, Stevan A.

AU - Kim, Won

AU - Ahmed, Aijaz

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AB - Background & Aims: Little is known about trends in mortality among Hispanic subpopulations and etiologies of chronic liver disease (CLD). We investigated trends in mortality of CLD among the 3 largest Hispanic subgroups based on origin (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans) in the United States (US) from 2007 to 2016. Methods: We collected data from the US Census and national mortality database, calculated age-standardized mortalities for CLD among Hispanic subgroups, and compared these with non-Hispanic whites. We determined mortality rate patterns by joinpoint analysis with estimates of annual percentage change. Results: Hispanics were relatively younger with a lower likelihood of high school education than non-Hispanic whites at time of death. Puerto Ricans had the highest rates of age-standardized hepatitis C virus-related mortality in 2016, followed by non-Hispanic whites, Mexicans, and Cubans. Age-standardized mortality rates associated with hepatitis B virus infection decreased steadily among all subjects. Age-standardized mortality rates from alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among non-Hispanic whites and all Hispanics increased and accelerated. Mexicans had the highest rates of age-standardized alcoholic liver disease-related mortality, followed by non-Hispanic whites, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans. Cirrhosis- and hepatocellular carcinoma-related mortality rates increased steadily from 2007 to 2016, with the highest among Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites and Mexicans, and lowest in Cubans. Conclusions: We found high levels of heterogeneity in CLD-related mortality patterns among the 3 largest Hispanic subgroups. Therefore, combining Hispanics as an aggregate group obscures potentially meaningful heterogeneity in etiology-specific CLD-related mortality rates among Hispanic subgroups.

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KW - HBV

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KW - Latino

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