Differences in incidence, mortality and survival of breast cancer by regions and countries in Asia and contributing factors

Yeonju Kim, Keun Young Yoo, Marc T. Goodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although the incidence of breast cancer in Asia remains lower than in North America, Western Europe, and Oceania, rates have been increasing rapidly during the past few decades, and Asian countries now account for 40% of breast cancer cases diagnosed worldwide. Breast cancer mortality has also increased among Asian women, in contrast to decreased mortality in Northern America, Western Europe, and Oceania. These increased rates are associated with higher prevalence of breast cancer risk factors (e.g., reduced parity, delayed childbirth, increased obesity) that have accompanied economic development throughout the region. However, Asian regions (western, south-central, south-eastern, and eastern) and countries differ in the types and magnitude of changes in breast cancer risk factors, and cannot be viewed as a single homogeneous group. The objective of this paper was to contrast the heterogeneous epidemiology of breast cancer by Asian regions and countries, and to suggest potential avenues for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2857-2870
Number of pages14
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Asia
  • Breast cancer
  • Epidemiology
  • Incidence
  • Mortality
  • Risk factor
  • Survival

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