Difference in the nature of dizziness between vestibular neuritis and sudden sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo

Jae Yun Jung, Yun Ho Kim, Myung Whan Suh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine whether any clinical difference existed with respect to the characteristics of dizziness in vestibular neuritis (VN) and sudden sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo (SHLV). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Included in this study were 22 SHLV patients and 32 VN patients who had been confirmed of unilateral caloric weakness. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss accompanied sudden attack of rotatory vertigo. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical features such as comorbidity, duration of vertigo, duration of spontaneous nystagmus, and others were compared between the 2 groups. Medical records related to the vestibular function test were also reviewed. RESULTS: When comparing comorbid diseases and symptoms, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. There were also no differences in the duration of spontaneous nystagmus and vertigo symptoms. However, the proportion of patients with abnormal vestibular evoked myogenic potential response was significantly smaller in the VN group compared with the SHLV group. CONCLUSION: Patients with SHLV are much more likely to have saccule/inferior vestibular nerve involvement than patients with VN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)623-628
Number of pages6
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Vestibular Neuronitis
Sudden Hearing Loss
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Vertigo
Dizziness
Vestibular Function Tests
Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials
Vestibular Nerve
Saccule and Utricle
Tertiary Care Centers
Medical Records
Comorbidity

Keywords

  • Dizziness
  • Nystagmus
  • Sudden sensorineural hearing loss
  • Vertigo
  • Vestibular evoked myogenic potential
  • Vestibular neuritis

Cite this

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine whether any clinical difference existed with respect to the characteristics of dizziness in vestibular neuritis (VN) and sudden sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo (SHLV). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Included in this study were 22 SHLV patients and 32 VN patients who had been confirmed of unilateral caloric weakness. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss accompanied sudden attack of rotatory vertigo. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical features such as comorbidity, duration of vertigo, duration of spontaneous nystagmus, and others were compared between the 2 groups. Medical records related to the vestibular function test were also reviewed. RESULTS: When comparing comorbid diseases and symptoms, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. There were also no differences in the duration of spontaneous nystagmus and vertigo symptoms. However, the proportion of patients with abnormal vestibular evoked myogenic potential response was significantly smaller in the VN group compared with the SHLV group. CONCLUSION: Patients with SHLV are much more likely to have saccule/inferior vestibular nerve involvement than patients with VN.",
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Difference in the nature of dizziness between vestibular neuritis and sudden sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo. / Jung, Jae Yun; Kim, Yun Ho; Suh, Myung Whan.

In: Otology and Neurotology, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.06.2012, p. 623-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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KW - Nystagmus

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