Dietary fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults

Yoo Jin Um, Seung Won Oh, Cheol Min Lee, Hyuk Tae Kwon, Hee Kyung Joh, Young Ju Kim, Hyun Joo Kim, Sang Hyun Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The effect of dietary fat intake on the risk of cardiovascular disease remains unclear. We investigated the association between dietary fat and specific types of fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome. Methods: The study population included 1,662 healthy adults who were 50.2 years of age and had no known hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or metabolic syndrome at the initial visit. Dietary intake was obtained from a 1-day food record. During 20.7 months of follow-up, we documented 147 cases of metabolic syndrome confirmed by self-report, anthropometric data, and blood test results. The intakes of total fat, vegetable fat, animal fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), and cholesterol level divided by quintile. Multivariate analyses included age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, total calorie, and protein intake. Results: Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with metabolic syndrome risk (odds ratio for the highest vs. the lowest quintile, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.76). Total fat, animal fat, SFA, PUFA, MUFA, and cholesterol intakes showed no association with metabolic syndrome. Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with the risk of hypertriglyceridemia among the components of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: These data support an inverse association between vegetable fat and the risk of metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-252
Number of pages8
JournalKorean Journal of Family Medicine
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Fingerprint

Dietary Fats
Fats
Vegetables
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Fatty Acids
Odds Ratio
Cholesterol
Hypertriglyceridemia
Hematologic Tests
Hyperlipidemias
Self Report
Body Mass Index
Cardiovascular Diseases
Multivariate Analysis
Smoking
Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Dietary fats
  • Metabolic syndrome

Cite this

@article{df8cf8f609eb4b29b106f97ff5cc7585,
title = "Dietary fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults",
abstract = "Background: The effect of dietary fat intake on the risk of cardiovascular disease remains unclear. We investigated the association between dietary fat and specific types of fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome. Methods: The study population included 1,662 healthy adults who were 50.2 years of age and had no known hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or metabolic syndrome at the initial visit. Dietary intake was obtained from a 1-day food record. During 20.7 months of follow-up, we documented 147 cases of metabolic syndrome confirmed by self-report, anthropometric data, and blood test results. The intakes of total fat, vegetable fat, animal fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), and cholesterol level divided by quintile. Multivariate analyses included age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, total calorie, and protein intake. Results: Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with metabolic syndrome risk (odds ratio for the highest vs. the lowest quintile, 0.33; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.76). Total fat, animal fat, SFA, PUFA, MUFA, and cholesterol intakes showed no association with metabolic syndrome. Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with the risk of hypertriglyceridemia among the components of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: These data support an inverse association between vegetable fat and the risk of metabolic syndrome.",
keywords = "Cardiovascular diseases, Dietary fats, Metabolic syndrome",
author = "Um, {Yoo Jin} and Oh, {Seung Won} and Lee, {Cheol Min} and Kwon, {Hyuk Tae} and Joh, {Hee Kyung} and Kim, {Young Ju} and Kim, {Hyun Joo} and Ahn, {Sang Hyun}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4082/kjfm.2015.36.5.245",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "245--252",
journal = "Korean Journal of Family Medicine",
issn = "2005-6443",
publisher = "Korean Academy of Family Medicine",
number = "5",

}

Dietary fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults. / Um, Yoo Jin; Oh, Seung Won; Lee, Cheol Min; Kwon, Hyuk Tae; Joh, Hee Kyung; Kim, Young Ju; Kim, Hyun Joo; Ahn, Sang Hyun.

In: Korean Journal of Family Medicine, Vol. 36, No. 5, 01.01.2015, p. 245-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults

AU - Um, Yoo Jin

AU - Oh, Seung Won

AU - Lee, Cheol Min

AU - Kwon, Hyuk Tae

AU - Joh, Hee Kyung

AU - Kim, Young Ju

AU - Kim, Hyun Joo

AU - Ahn, Sang Hyun

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: The effect of dietary fat intake on the risk of cardiovascular disease remains unclear. We investigated the association between dietary fat and specific types of fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome. Methods: The study population included 1,662 healthy adults who were 50.2 years of age and had no known hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or metabolic syndrome at the initial visit. Dietary intake was obtained from a 1-day food record. During 20.7 months of follow-up, we documented 147 cases of metabolic syndrome confirmed by self-report, anthropometric data, and blood test results. The intakes of total fat, vegetable fat, animal fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), and cholesterol level divided by quintile. Multivariate analyses included age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, total calorie, and protein intake. Results: Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with metabolic syndrome risk (odds ratio for the highest vs. the lowest quintile, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.76). Total fat, animal fat, SFA, PUFA, MUFA, and cholesterol intakes showed no association with metabolic syndrome. Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with the risk of hypertriglyceridemia among the components of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: These data support an inverse association between vegetable fat and the risk of metabolic syndrome.

AB - Background: The effect of dietary fat intake on the risk of cardiovascular disease remains unclear. We investigated the association between dietary fat and specific types of fat intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome. Methods: The study population included 1,662 healthy adults who were 50.2 years of age and had no known hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or metabolic syndrome at the initial visit. Dietary intake was obtained from a 1-day food record. During 20.7 months of follow-up, we documented 147 cases of metabolic syndrome confirmed by self-report, anthropometric data, and blood test results. The intakes of total fat, vegetable fat, animal fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), and cholesterol level divided by quintile. Multivariate analyses included age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, total calorie, and protein intake. Results: Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with metabolic syndrome risk (odds ratio for the highest vs. the lowest quintile, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.76). Total fat, animal fat, SFA, PUFA, MUFA, and cholesterol intakes showed no association with metabolic syndrome. Vegetable fat intake was inversely associated with the risk of hypertriglyceridemia among the components of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: These data support an inverse association between vegetable fat and the risk of metabolic syndrome.

KW - Cardiovascular diseases

KW - Dietary fats

KW - Metabolic syndrome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84943556246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4082/kjfm.2015.36.5.245

DO - 10.4082/kjfm.2015.36.5.245

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84943556246

VL - 36

SP - 245

EP - 252

JO - Korean Journal of Family Medicine

JF - Korean Journal of Family Medicine

SN - 2005-6443

IS - 5

ER -