Depressive Symptoms are Associated with Progression to Dementia in Patients with Amyloid-Positive Mild Cognitive Impairment

For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Depressive symptoms are prevalent in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are considered to be a risk factor for progression to dementia. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether depressive symptoms in MCI promote disease progression in a manner related to amyloid status, and to determine the relationship between depressive symptoms and longitudinal cerebral structural changes. Methods: Baseline data for 336 patients with MCI (75 with depression and 261 without) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study were analyzed. All participants underwent comprehensive cognitive testing, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and [18F]AV45 positron emission tomography amyloid imaging. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire. A voxel-based morphometric analysis using volumetric brain MRI data was used to compare longitudinal structural changes related to depressive symptoms. Results: The conversion rate to dementia was different between patients with and without depression in amyloid-positive MCI (40.8 versus 19.7, respectively; p = 0.006). Patients who were amyloid-positive at baseline also exhibited a greater degree of 2-year cognitive decline. Depression in amyloid-positive MCI was associated with longitudinal cortical atrophy in the left cingulate gyrus. Conclusion: Our study indicates that the presence of depressive symptoms in patients with amyloid-positive MCI is associated with higher progression to dementia and longitudinal cortical atrophy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1255-1264
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Amyloid
Dementia
Depression
Atrophy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Cognitive Dysfunction
Gyrus Cinguli
Neuroimaging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Disease Progression
Alzheimer Disease
Equipment and Supplies
Brain

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • depression
  • mild cognitive impairment

Cite this

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title = "Depressive Symptoms are Associated with Progression to Dementia in Patients with Amyloid-Positive Mild Cognitive Impairment",
abstract = "Background: Depressive symptoms are prevalent in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are considered to be a risk factor for progression to dementia. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether depressive symptoms in MCI promote disease progression in a manner related to amyloid status, and to determine the relationship between depressive symptoms and longitudinal cerebral structural changes. Methods: Baseline data for 336 patients with MCI (75 with depression and 261 without) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study were analyzed. All participants underwent comprehensive cognitive testing, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and [18F]AV45 positron emission tomography amyloid imaging. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire. A voxel-based morphometric analysis using volumetric brain MRI data was used to compare longitudinal structural changes related to depressive symptoms. Results: The conversion rate to dementia was different between patients with and without depression in amyloid-positive MCI (40.8 versus 19.7, respectively; p = 0.006). Patients who were amyloid-positive at baseline also exhibited a greater degree of 2-year cognitive decline. Depression in amyloid-positive MCI was associated with longitudinal cortical atrophy in the left cingulate gyrus. Conclusion: Our study indicates that the presence of depressive symptoms in patients with amyloid-positive MCI is associated with higher progression to dementia and longitudinal cortical atrophy.",
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author = "{For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative} and Byungseung Moon and Seongheon Kim and Park, {Young Ho} and Lim, {Jae Sung} and Youn, {Young Chul} and Kim, {Sang Yun} and Jang, {Jae Won}",
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Depressive Symptoms are Associated with Progression to Dementia in Patients with Amyloid-Positive Mild Cognitive Impairment. / For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 58, No. 4, 01.01.2017, p. 1255-1264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Depressive Symptoms are Associated with Progression to Dementia in Patients with Amyloid-Positive Mild Cognitive Impairment

AU - For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

AU - Moon, Byungseung

AU - Kim, Seongheon

AU - Park, Young Ho

AU - Lim, Jae Sung

AU - Youn, Young Chul

AU - Kim, Sang Yun

AU - Jang, Jae Won

PY - 2017/1/1

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N2 - Background: Depressive symptoms are prevalent in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are considered to be a risk factor for progression to dementia. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether depressive symptoms in MCI promote disease progression in a manner related to amyloid status, and to determine the relationship between depressive symptoms and longitudinal cerebral structural changes. Methods: Baseline data for 336 patients with MCI (75 with depression and 261 without) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study were analyzed. All participants underwent comprehensive cognitive testing, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and [18F]AV45 positron emission tomography amyloid imaging. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire. A voxel-based morphometric analysis using volumetric brain MRI data was used to compare longitudinal structural changes related to depressive symptoms. Results: The conversion rate to dementia was different between patients with and without depression in amyloid-positive MCI (40.8 versus 19.7, respectively; p = 0.006). Patients who were amyloid-positive at baseline also exhibited a greater degree of 2-year cognitive decline. Depression in amyloid-positive MCI was associated with longitudinal cortical atrophy in the left cingulate gyrus. Conclusion: Our study indicates that the presence of depressive symptoms in patients with amyloid-positive MCI is associated with higher progression to dementia and longitudinal cortical atrophy.

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