Depressive symptoms and self-reported occupational injury in small and medium-sized companies

Kwan Cheol Kim, Shin Goo Park, Kyoung-Bok Min, Ki Jung Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This survey was designed to determine whether depressive symptoms had an effect on the risk of self-reported occupational injury in South Korea. Methods: We conducted a prospective follow-up survey of workers at 44 small- to medium-sized companies classified into manufacturing or service businesses; 1,350 questionnaires were used in the final analysis. The first survey requested information regarding personal characteristics, work characteristics, and depressive symptoms (CES-D); the second survey queried participants in the first survey about self-reported occupational injuries (including minor scratches or cuts) experienced in the previous 4 months. Risk ratios (RRs) were calculated through Poisson regression analysis. The number of occupational injuries during the previous 4 months served as the dependent variable, and depressive symptoms served as the independent variable. Results: After adjustment for demographic factors, the RRs were 1.75 (95% CI: 1.41-2.18) and 2.68 (95% CI: 1.98-3.64) in male and female, respectively. Additional adjustment for work-related variables did not alter the RR considerably in females (2.65; 95% CI: 1.95-3.59). Among the male workers, however, the RR was not significant (1.21; 95% CI: 0.95-1.55). On the other hand, when the analysis was limited to blue-collar workers, after adjustment for demographic and work-related factors, the RRs remained significant in both genders (male: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.03-1.74; female: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.41-2.95). Conclusions: We found that the risk of self-reported occupational injury experience was higher in workers who reported depressive symptoms. Additional study using objective data is required to confirm our results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)715-721
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2009

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Occupational Injuries
Depression
Odds Ratio
Demography
Republic of Korea
Surveys and Questionnaires
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Occupational injury
  • Prospective study

Cite this

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title = "Depressive symptoms and self-reported occupational injury in small and medium-sized companies",
abstract = "Objectives: This survey was designed to determine whether depressive symptoms had an effect on the risk of self-reported occupational injury in South Korea. Methods: We conducted a prospective follow-up survey of workers at 44 small- to medium-sized companies classified into manufacturing or service businesses; 1,350 questionnaires were used in the final analysis. The first survey requested information regarding personal characteristics, work characteristics, and depressive symptoms (CES-D); the second survey queried participants in the first survey about self-reported occupational injuries (including minor scratches or cuts) experienced in the previous 4 months. Risk ratios (RRs) were calculated through Poisson regression analysis. The number of occupational injuries during the previous 4 months served as the dependent variable, and depressive symptoms served as the independent variable. Results: After adjustment for demographic factors, the RRs were 1.75 (95{\%} CI: 1.41-2.18) and 2.68 (95{\%} CI: 1.98-3.64) in male and female, respectively. Additional adjustment for work-related variables did not alter the RR considerably in females (2.65; 95{\%} CI: 1.95-3.59). Among the male workers, however, the RR was not significant (1.21; 95{\%} CI: 0.95-1.55). On the other hand, when the analysis was limited to blue-collar workers, after adjustment for demographic and work-related factors, the RRs remained significant in both genders (male: 1.34; 95{\%} CI: 1.03-1.74; female: 2.04; 95{\%} CI: 1.41-2.95). Conclusions: We found that the risk of self-reported occupational injury experience was higher in workers who reported depressive symptoms. Additional study using objective data is required to confirm our results.",
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Depressive symptoms and self-reported occupational injury in small and medium-sized companies. / Kim, Kwan Cheol; Park, Shin Goo; Min, Kyoung-Bok; Yoon, Ki Jung.

In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 82, No. 6, 01.01.2009, p. 715-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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