Degradation of MyoD by the ubiquitin pathway

Regulation by specific DNA-binding and identification of a novel site for ubiquitination

Aaron Ciechanover, Kristin Breitschopf, Ossama Abu Hatoum, Eyal Bengal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

MyoD is a tissue-specific transcriptional activator involved in skeletal muscle differentiation. It is induced during transition from proliferating, non-differentiated myoblasts to the resting and well differentiated myotubes. Like many other transcriptional regulators, it is short-lived, however, the targeting proteolytic pathway and the underlying regulatory mechanisms involved have remained obscure. Here we show that MyoD is degraded by the ubiquitin system both in vivo and in vitro. In cells, degradation is inhibited by lactacystin, a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome. Inhibition is accompanied by accumulation of MyoD-ubiquitin conjugates. In a cell free system, the proteolytic process requires both ATP and ubiquitin and is preceded by formation of MyoD-ubiquitin adducts. Interestingly, the process is inhibited by the specific DNA sequence to which MyoD binds. Analysis of the ubiquitination site has revealed that the N-terminal residue of MyoD is sufficient and essential to promote conjugation and subsequent degradation of the protein: conjugation to internal Lys residues is not necessary. Substitution of all Lys residues did not affect significantly its degradation either in intact cells or in a reconstituted cell free system. Degradation was inhibited by specific proteasome inhibitors and was accompanied by accumulation of ubiquitinated species of the protein. We concluded that the first ubiquitin moiety is attached via its C-terminal Gly to the N-terminal residue of MyoD, and the polyubiquitin chain is then synthesized on Lys48 of this moiety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-64
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular Biology Reports
Volume26
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - 1 Apr 1999

Fingerprint

Ubiquitination
Ubiquitin
DNA
Cell-Free System
Ubiquitinated Proteins
Polyubiquitin
Proteasome Inhibitors
Myoblasts
Skeletal Muscle Fibers
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Proteolysis
Skeletal Muscle
Adenosine Triphosphate

Keywords

  • DNA binding
  • MyoD
  • N-terminus
  • Proteolysis
  • Ubiquitin

Cite this

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title = "Degradation of MyoD by the ubiquitin pathway: Regulation by specific DNA-binding and identification of a novel site for ubiquitination",
abstract = "MyoD is a tissue-specific transcriptional activator involved in skeletal muscle differentiation. It is induced during transition from proliferating, non-differentiated myoblasts to the resting and well differentiated myotubes. Like many other transcriptional regulators, it is short-lived, however, the targeting proteolytic pathway and the underlying regulatory mechanisms involved have remained obscure. Here we show that MyoD is degraded by the ubiquitin system both in vivo and in vitro. In cells, degradation is inhibited by lactacystin, a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome. Inhibition is accompanied by accumulation of MyoD-ubiquitin conjugates. In a cell free system, the proteolytic process requires both ATP and ubiquitin and is preceded by formation of MyoD-ubiquitin adducts. Interestingly, the process is inhibited by the specific DNA sequence to which MyoD binds. Analysis of the ubiquitination site has revealed that the N-terminal residue of MyoD is sufficient and essential to promote conjugation and subsequent degradation of the protein: conjugation to internal Lys residues is not necessary. Substitution of all Lys residues did not affect significantly its degradation either in intact cells or in a reconstituted cell free system. Degradation was inhibited by specific proteasome inhibitors and was accompanied by accumulation of ubiquitinated species of the protein. We concluded that the first ubiquitin moiety is attached via its C-terminal Gly to the N-terminal residue of MyoD, and the polyubiquitin chain is then synthesized on Lys48 of this moiety.",
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Degradation of MyoD by the ubiquitin pathway : Regulation by specific DNA-binding and identification of a novel site for ubiquitination. / Ciechanover, Aaron; Breitschopf, Kristin; Abu Hatoum, Ossama; Bengal, Eyal.

In: Molecular Biology Reports, Vol. 26, No. 1-2, 01.04.1999, p. 59-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Degradation of MyoD by the ubiquitin pathway

T2 - Regulation by specific DNA-binding and identification of a novel site for ubiquitination

AU - Ciechanover, Aaron

AU - Breitschopf, Kristin

AU - Abu Hatoum, Ossama

AU - Bengal, Eyal

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N2 - MyoD is a tissue-specific transcriptional activator involved in skeletal muscle differentiation. It is induced during transition from proliferating, non-differentiated myoblasts to the resting and well differentiated myotubes. Like many other transcriptional regulators, it is short-lived, however, the targeting proteolytic pathway and the underlying regulatory mechanisms involved have remained obscure. Here we show that MyoD is degraded by the ubiquitin system both in vivo and in vitro. In cells, degradation is inhibited by lactacystin, a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome. Inhibition is accompanied by accumulation of MyoD-ubiquitin conjugates. In a cell free system, the proteolytic process requires both ATP and ubiquitin and is preceded by formation of MyoD-ubiquitin adducts. Interestingly, the process is inhibited by the specific DNA sequence to which MyoD binds. Analysis of the ubiquitination site has revealed that the N-terminal residue of MyoD is sufficient and essential to promote conjugation and subsequent degradation of the protein: conjugation to internal Lys residues is not necessary. Substitution of all Lys residues did not affect significantly its degradation either in intact cells or in a reconstituted cell free system. Degradation was inhibited by specific proteasome inhibitors and was accompanied by accumulation of ubiquitinated species of the protein. We concluded that the first ubiquitin moiety is attached via its C-terminal Gly to the N-terminal residue of MyoD, and the polyubiquitin chain is then synthesized on Lys48 of this moiety.

AB - MyoD is a tissue-specific transcriptional activator involved in skeletal muscle differentiation. It is induced during transition from proliferating, non-differentiated myoblasts to the resting and well differentiated myotubes. Like many other transcriptional regulators, it is short-lived, however, the targeting proteolytic pathway and the underlying regulatory mechanisms involved have remained obscure. Here we show that MyoD is degraded by the ubiquitin system both in vivo and in vitro. In cells, degradation is inhibited by lactacystin, a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome. Inhibition is accompanied by accumulation of MyoD-ubiquitin conjugates. In a cell free system, the proteolytic process requires both ATP and ubiquitin and is preceded by formation of MyoD-ubiquitin adducts. Interestingly, the process is inhibited by the specific DNA sequence to which MyoD binds. Analysis of the ubiquitination site has revealed that the N-terminal residue of MyoD is sufficient and essential to promote conjugation and subsequent degradation of the protein: conjugation to internal Lys residues is not necessary. Substitution of all Lys residues did not affect significantly its degradation either in intact cells or in a reconstituted cell free system. Degradation was inhibited by specific proteasome inhibitors and was accompanied by accumulation of ubiquitinated species of the protein. We concluded that the first ubiquitin moiety is attached via its C-terminal Gly to the N-terminal residue of MyoD, and the polyubiquitin chain is then synthesized on Lys48 of this moiety.

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