Correlation between RICTOR overexpression and amplification in advanced solid tumors

Heejin Bang, Soomin Ahn, Eun Ji Kim, Seung Tae Kim, Ha Young Park, Jeeyun Lee, Kyoung Mee Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR (RICTOR) is a key component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2), and promotes cellular proliferation and survival through the activation of downstream AGC kinase family members. The amplification of RICTOR has been proposed as a therapeutically relevant genomic alteration. However, other than next-generation sequencing, precise diagnostic methods to detect RICTOR amplification in advanced solid cancers have not been fully explored. We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis on solid tumor tissues from 435 cancer patients. Overexpression of RICTOR was found in 213 cases (49.0 %: 1+, 29.4 %; 2+, 15.2 %; 3+, 4.4 %) consisting of 111 colorectal cancers, 42 gastric cancers, 16 renal cell carcinomas, 8 soft tissue sarcomas, 6 hepatocellular carcinomas, 6 cholangiocarcinomas, 4 lung cancers, and 37 other tumors. RICTOR overexpression was heterogeneous (stained < 50 % of the tumor volume) in 32.4 % (12/37) of IHC-positive cases. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 37 RICTOR-overexpressed IHC-positive cases (1+, 12; 2+, 11; 3+, 14) and 13 IHC-negative solid tumors. FISH enabled us to detect RICTOR amplification in 7/12 (58.3 %) IHC 1+, 10/11 (90.9 %) IHC 2+, and 11/14 (78.6 %) IHC 3+ cases. In total, there was amplification in 75.7 % (n = 28) of the RICTOR-overexpressed cases, according to FISH. There was RICTOR amplification in only 7.7 % of the RICTOR IHC-negative cases. RICTOR amplification was significantly more common in IHC-positive cases than in IHC-negative cases (p < 0.0001). The IHC results correlated well with those of FISH (r = 0.60). RICTOR overexpression is more common in solid tumors than previously reported in cases detected by next-generation sequencing. This discrepancy may be caused by intratumoral heterogeneity. In conclusion, heterogeneous RICTOR overexpression is common in solid tumors and RICTOR IHC can be used as a screening tool to detect RICTOR amplification.

Original languageEnglish
Article number152734
JournalPathology Research and Practice
Volume216
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

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Sirolimus
Immunohistochemistry
Neoplasms
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Stomach Neoplasms
Cholangiocarcinoma
Tumor Burden
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Sarcoma
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Colorectal Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • RICTOR
  • Target

Cite this

Bang, Heejin ; Ahn, Soomin ; Ji Kim, Eun ; Kim, Seung Tae ; Park, Ha Young ; Lee, Jeeyun ; Kim, Kyoung Mee. / Correlation between RICTOR overexpression and amplification in advanced solid tumors. In: Pathology Research and Practice. 2020 ; Vol. 216, No. 1.
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title = "Correlation between RICTOR overexpression and amplification in advanced solid tumors",
abstract = "Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR (RICTOR) is a key component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2), and promotes cellular proliferation and survival through the activation of downstream AGC kinase family members. The amplification of RICTOR has been proposed as a therapeutically relevant genomic alteration. However, other than next-generation sequencing, precise diagnostic methods to detect RICTOR amplification in advanced solid cancers have not been fully explored. We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis on solid tumor tissues from 435 cancer patients. Overexpression of RICTOR was found in 213 cases (49.0 {\%}: 1+, 29.4 {\%}; 2+, 15.2 {\%}; 3+, 4.4 {\%}) consisting of 111 colorectal cancers, 42 gastric cancers, 16 renal cell carcinomas, 8 soft tissue sarcomas, 6 hepatocellular carcinomas, 6 cholangiocarcinomas, 4 lung cancers, and 37 other tumors. RICTOR overexpression was heterogeneous (stained < 50 {\%} of the tumor volume) in 32.4 {\%} (12/37) of IHC-positive cases. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 37 RICTOR-overexpressed IHC-positive cases (1+, 12; 2+, 11; 3+, 14) and 13 IHC-negative solid tumors. FISH enabled us to detect RICTOR amplification in 7/12 (58.3 {\%}) IHC 1+, 10/11 (90.9 {\%}) IHC 2+, and 11/14 (78.6 {\%}) IHC 3+ cases. In total, there was amplification in 75.7 {\%} (n = 28) of the RICTOR-overexpressed cases, according to FISH. There was RICTOR amplification in only 7.7 {\%} of the RICTOR IHC-negative cases. RICTOR amplification was significantly more common in IHC-positive cases than in IHC-negative cases (p < 0.0001). The IHC results correlated well with those of FISH (r = 0.60). RICTOR overexpression is more common in solid tumors than previously reported in cases detected by next-generation sequencing. This discrepancy may be caused by intratumoral heterogeneity. In conclusion, heterogeneous RICTOR overexpression is common in solid tumors and RICTOR IHC can be used as a screening tool to detect RICTOR amplification.",
keywords = "Fluorescence in situ hybridization, Immunohistochemistry, RICTOR, Target",
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Correlation between RICTOR overexpression and amplification in advanced solid tumors. / Bang, Heejin; Ahn, Soomin; Ji Kim, Eun; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Ha Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Kim, Kyoung Mee.

In: Pathology Research and Practice, Vol. 216, No. 1, 152734, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlation between RICTOR overexpression and amplification in advanced solid tumors

AU - Bang, Heejin

AU - Ahn, Soomin

AU - Ji Kim, Eun

AU - Kim, Seung Tae

AU - Park, Ha Young

AU - Lee, Jeeyun

AU - Kim, Kyoung Mee

PY - 2020/1

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N2 - Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR (RICTOR) is a key component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2), and promotes cellular proliferation and survival through the activation of downstream AGC kinase family members. The amplification of RICTOR has been proposed as a therapeutically relevant genomic alteration. However, other than next-generation sequencing, precise diagnostic methods to detect RICTOR amplification in advanced solid cancers have not been fully explored. We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis on solid tumor tissues from 435 cancer patients. Overexpression of RICTOR was found in 213 cases (49.0 %: 1+, 29.4 %; 2+, 15.2 %; 3+, 4.4 %) consisting of 111 colorectal cancers, 42 gastric cancers, 16 renal cell carcinomas, 8 soft tissue sarcomas, 6 hepatocellular carcinomas, 6 cholangiocarcinomas, 4 lung cancers, and 37 other tumors. RICTOR overexpression was heterogeneous (stained < 50 % of the tumor volume) in 32.4 % (12/37) of IHC-positive cases. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 37 RICTOR-overexpressed IHC-positive cases (1+, 12; 2+, 11; 3+, 14) and 13 IHC-negative solid tumors. FISH enabled us to detect RICTOR amplification in 7/12 (58.3 %) IHC 1+, 10/11 (90.9 %) IHC 2+, and 11/14 (78.6 %) IHC 3+ cases. In total, there was amplification in 75.7 % (n = 28) of the RICTOR-overexpressed cases, according to FISH. There was RICTOR amplification in only 7.7 % of the RICTOR IHC-negative cases. RICTOR amplification was significantly more common in IHC-positive cases than in IHC-negative cases (p < 0.0001). The IHC results correlated well with those of FISH (r = 0.60). RICTOR overexpression is more common in solid tumors than previously reported in cases detected by next-generation sequencing. This discrepancy may be caused by intratumoral heterogeneity. In conclusion, heterogeneous RICTOR overexpression is common in solid tumors and RICTOR IHC can be used as a screening tool to detect RICTOR amplification.

AB - Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR (RICTOR) is a key component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2), and promotes cellular proliferation and survival through the activation of downstream AGC kinase family members. The amplification of RICTOR has been proposed as a therapeutically relevant genomic alteration. However, other than next-generation sequencing, precise diagnostic methods to detect RICTOR amplification in advanced solid cancers have not been fully explored. We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis on solid tumor tissues from 435 cancer patients. Overexpression of RICTOR was found in 213 cases (49.0 %: 1+, 29.4 %; 2+, 15.2 %; 3+, 4.4 %) consisting of 111 colorectal cancers, 42 gastric cancers, 16 renal cell carcinomas, 8 soft tissue sarcomas, 6 hepatocellular carcinomas, 6 cholangiocarcinomas, 4 lung cancers, and 37 other tumors. RICTOR overexpression was heterogeneous (stained < 50 % of the tumor volume) in 32.4 % (12/37) of IHC-positive cases. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 37 RICTOR-overexpressed IHC-positive cases (1+, 12; 2+, 11; 3+, 14) and 13 IHC-negative solid tumors. FISH enabled us to detect RICTOR amplification in 7/12 (58.3 %) IHC 1+, 10/11 (90.9 %) IHC 2+, and 11/14 (78.6 %) IHC 3+ cases. In total, there was amplification in 75.7 % (n = 28) of the RICTOR-overexpressed cases, according to FISH. There was RICTOR amplification in only 7.7 % of the RICTOR IHC-negative cases. RICTOR amplification was significantly more common in IHC-positive cases than in IHC-negative cases (p < 0.0001). The IHC results correlated well with those of FISH (r = 0.60). RICTOR overexpression is more common in solid tumors than previously reported in cases detected by next-generation sequencing. This discrepancy may be caused by intratumoral heterogeneity. In conclusion, heterogeneous RICTOR overexpression is common in solid tumors and RICTOR IHC can be used as a screening tool to detect RICTOR amplification.

KW - Fluorescence in situ hybridization

KW - Immunohistochemistry

KW - RICTOR

KW - Target

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