Contraceptive methods and the risk of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in young women

Byung Joo Park, Andy Stergachis, Delia Scholes, Fred E. Heidrich, King K. Holmes, Walter E. Stamm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate the relation between contraceptive methods and cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the authors studied a population-based sample of 1,779 nonpregnant women aged 15-34 years who underwent cell culture diagnostic testing for the detection of C. trachomatis at a health maintenance organization. Barrier contraceptive method users were classified as those who reported using one of the following methods at time of testing: condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, spermicidal sponge, foam, or vaginal spermicidal suppositories. Barrier methods were associated with a reduction in the risk of chlamydial infection in women aged 25 years or older when compared with all other women in the same age category (adjusted prevalence odds ratio = 0.15, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.04-0.66). When compared with only noncontracepting women, the adjusted prevalence odds ratio was 0.34 (95% Cl 0.06-1.99). The protective effect of barrier methods was not evident in women younger than age 25 years. Oral contraceptive use was not associated with the risk of C. trachomatis infection using either referent group; the adjusted prevalence odds ratio was 0.99 (95% Cl 0.57-1.73) compared with all other women, and 0.88 (95% Cl 0.44-1.79) compared with noncontracepting women. These findings suggest that present patterns of use of barrier methods differ by age and afford only selective protection against cervical C. trachomatis infections. Am J Epidemiol 1995;142:771-8.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)771-778
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume142
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 1995

Fingerprint

Chlamydia Infections
Chlamydia trachomatis
Contraception
Odds Ratio
Barrier Contraception
Female Contraceptive Devices
Suppositories
Health Maintenance Organizations
Condoms
Porifera
Risk Reduction Behavior
Oral Contraceptives
Diaphragm
Cell Culture Techniques
Confidence Intervals
Infection
Population

Keywords

  • Cervix diseases;
  • Chlamydia trachomatis;
  • Contraceptive devices,
  • Contraceptives,
  • Female; contraceptive devices,
  • Infection;
  • Male;
  • Oral;
  • Sexually transmitted diseases

Cite this

Park, Byung Joo ; Stergachis, Andy ; Scholes, Delia ; Heidrich, Fred E. ; Holmes, King K. ; Stamm, Walter E. / Contraceptive methods and the risk of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in young women. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1995 ; Vol. 142, No. 7. pp. 771-778.
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abstract = "To evaluate the relation between contraceptive methods and cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the authors studied a population-based sample of 1,779 nonpregnant women aged 15-34 years who underwent cell culture diagnostic testing for the detection of C. trachomatis at a health maintenance organization. Barrier contraceptive method users were classified as those who reported using one of the following methods at time of testing: condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, spermicidal sponge, foam, or vaginal spermicidal suppositories. Barrier methods were associated with a reduction in the risk of chlamydial infection in women aged 25 years or older when compared with all other women in the same age category (adjusted prevalence odds ratio = 0.15, 95{\%} confidence interval (Cl) 0.04-0.66). When compared with only noncontracepting women, the adjusted prevalence odds ratio was 0.34 (95{\%} Cl 0.06-1.99). The protective effect of barrier methods was not evident in women younger than age 25 years. Oral contraceptive use was not associated with the risk of C. trachomatis infection using either referent group; the adjusted prevalence odds ratio was 0.99 (95{\%} Cl 0.57-1.73) compared with all other women, and 0.88 (95{\%} Cl 0.44-1.79) compared with noncontracepting women. These findings suggest that present patterns of use of barrier methods differ by age and afford only selective protection against cervical C. trachomatis infections. Am J Epidemiol 1995;142:771-8.",
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Contraceptive methods and the risk of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in young women. / Park, Byung Joo; Stergachis, Andy; Scholes, Delia; Heidrich, Fred E.; Holmes, King K.; Stamm, Walter E.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 142, No. 7, 01.10.1995, p. 771-778.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Stamm, Walter E.

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