Comparison of Ocular Motor Findings Between Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder and Multiple Sclerosis Involving the Brainstem and Cerebellum

Sun Uk Lee, Hyo Jung Kim, Jae Hwan Choi, Jeong Yoon Choi, Ji-Soo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to define the clinical features and involved structures that aid in differentiation of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) from multiple sclerosis (MS) involving the brainstem and cerebellum. We analyzed the clinical and ocular motor findings, and lesion distribution on brain MRIs in 42 patients with MS (17 men, mean age ± SD = 37 ± 12) and 26 with NMOSD (3 men, mean age ± SD = 43 ± 15) that were recruited from two university hospitals in South Korea (whole study population). An additional subgroup analysis was also conducted in 41 patients presenting acute brainstem or vestibular syndrome (brainstem syndrome population). Logistic regression analysis showed that bilaterality of the lesions (p = 0.012) and presence of horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus (hGEN, p = 0.041) were more frequently associated with NMOSD than with MS in the whole study population. In the brainstem syndrome population, only hGEN (p = 0.017) was more frequent in NMOSD than in MS. The lesions specific for NMOSD were overlapped in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (NPH) at the pontomedullary junction. In conclusion, presence of hGEN and bilateral lesions involving the MVN and NPH favor the diagnosis of NMOSD rather than MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)511-518
Number of pages8
JournalCerebellum
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jun 2019

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Neuromyelitis Optica
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
Multiple Sclerosis
Vestibular Nuclei
Population
Republic of Korea
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Brain

Keywords

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder
  • Nystagmus
  • Vertigo

Cite this

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title = "Comparison of Ocular Motor Findings Between Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder and Multiple Sclerosis Involving the Brainstem and Cerebellum",
abstract = "This study aimed to define the clinical features and involved structures that aid in differentiation of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) from multiple sclerosis (MS) involving the brainstem and cerebellum. We analyzed the clinical and ocular motor findings, and lesion distribution on brain MRIs in 42 patients with MS (17 men, mean age ± SD = 37 ± 12) and 26 with NMOSD (3 men, mean age ± SD = 43 ± 15) that were recruited from two university hospitals in South Korea (whole study population). An additional subgroup analysis was also conducted in 41 patients presenting acute brainstem or vestibular syndrome (brainstem syndrome population). Logistic regression analysis showed that bilaterality of the lesions (p = 0.012) and presence of horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus (hGEN, p = 0.041) were more frequently associated with NMOSD than with MS in the whole study population. In the brainstem syndrome population, only hGEN (p = 0.017) was more frequent in NMOSD than in MS. The lesions specific for NMOSD were overlapped in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (NPH) at the pontomedullary junction. In conclusion, presence of hGEN and bilateral lesions involving the MVN and NPH favor the diagnosis of NMOSD rather than MS.",
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Comparison of Ocular Motor Findings Between Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder and Multiple Sclerosis Involving the Brainstem and Cerebellum. / Lee, Sun Uk; Kim, Hyo Jung; Choi, Jae Hwan; Choi, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Ji-Soo.

In: Cerebellum, Vol. 18, No. 3, 15.06.2019, p. 511-518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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