Comparability and utility of body composition measurement vs. anthropometric measurement for assessing obesity related health risks in Korean men

J. Y. Kim, Seung-June Oh, M. R. Chang, Y. G. Cho, K. H. Park, Y. J. Paek, S. H. Yoo, J. J. Cho, I. D. Caterson, H. J. Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Obesity is commonly assessed by body mass index (BMI) of which limitations come from an inability to distinguish body fat mass from lean mass. Several anthropometric measurements, including BMI, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio and waist-to-hip ratio have been used to predict metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of FMI or BF% combined with previous known anthropometric indices to assess the risk of metabolic syndrome in clinical practice. Methods: In 5534 men visiting a hospital for health check-ups, blood tests, anthropometric measurements and body composition analysis using BIA were performed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the odds ratios for metabolic syndrome and each component of metabolic syndrome among BMI, waist-to-height ratio, waist-to-hip ratio, FMI and BF%. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) for metabolic syndrome was compared between several measurements. The net reclassification improvement with integrated discrimination improvement was used for assessing value of body composition measurement. Results: The adjusted odds ratios of metabolic syndrome was 1.80 (95% CI, 1.71-1.89) for FMI and 1.15 (95% CI, 1.13-1.17) for BF%. Odds ratio of each metabolic component was highest for FMI among several anthropometric and body composition measurements. AUCs using the ROC curve for metabolic syndrome was highest for waist-to-height ratio, 0.823 (95% CI, 0.808-0.837) by National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. FMI caused a mild increase in integrated discrimination improvement when combined with waist-to-height ratio. Conclusions: Waist-to-height ratio seems to be the best screening tool for evaluating metabolic syndrome in Korean men, and adding FMI could result in a modest increase in integrated discrimination improvement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-80
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Practice
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2013

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Body Composition
Obesity
Health
Body Mass Index
Waist-Hip Ratio
Odds Ratio
ROC Curve
Area Under Curve
Hematologic Tests
Waist Circumference
Adipose Tissue
Logistic Models
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis
Waist-Height Ratio
Education

Cite this

Kim, J. Y. ; Oh, Seung-June ; Chang, M. R. ; Cho, Y. G. ; Park, K. H. ; Paek, Y. J. ; Yoo, S. H. ; Cho, J. J. ; Caterson, I. D. ; Song, H. J. / Comparability and utility of body composition measurement vs. anthropometric measurement for assessing obesity related health risks in Korean men. In: International Journal of Clinical Practice. 2013 ; Vol. 67, No. 1. pp. 73-80.
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title = "Comparability and utility of body composition measurement vs. anthropometric measurement for assessing obesity related health risks in Korean men",
abstract = "Background: Obesity is commonly assessed by body mass index (BMI) of which limitations come from an inability to distinguish body fat mass from lean mass. Several anthropometric measurements, including BMI, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio and waist-to-hip ratio have been used to predict metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of FMI or BF{\%} combined with previous known anthropometric indices to assess the risk of metabolic syndrome in clinical practice. Methods: In 5534 men visiting a hospital for health check-ups, blood tests, anthropometric measurements and body composition analysis using BIA were performed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the odds ratios for metabolic syndrome and each component of metabolic syndrome among BMI, waist-to-height ratio, waist-to-hip ratio, FMI and BF{\%}. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) for metabolic syndrome was compared between several measurements. The net reclassification improvement with integrated discrimination improvement was used for assessing value of body composition measurement. Results: The adjusted odds ratios of metabolic syndrome was 1.80 (95{\%} CI, 1.71-1.89) for FMI and 1.15 (95{\%} CI, 1.13-1.17) for BF{\%}. Odds ratio of each metabolic component was highest for FMI among several anthropometric and body composition measurements. AUCs using the ROC curve for metabolic syndrome was highest for waist-to-height ratio, 0.823 (95{\%} CI, 0.808-0.837) by National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. FMI caused a mild increase in integrated discrimination improvement when combined with waist-to-height ratio. Conclusions: Waist-to-height ratio seems to be the best screening tool for evaluating metabolic syndrome in Korean men, and adding FMI could result in a modest increase in integrated discrimination improvement.",
author = "Kim, {J. Y.} and Seung-June Oh and Chang, {M. R.} and Cho, {Y. G.} and Park, {K. H.} and Paek, {Y. J.} and Yoo, {S. H.} and Cho, {J. J.} and Caterson, {I. D.} and Song, {H. J.}",
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Comparability and utility of body composition measurement vs. anthropometric measurement for assessing obesity related health risks in Korean men. / Kim, J. Y.; Oh, Seung-June; Chang, M. R.; Cho, Y. G.; Park, K. H.; Paek, Y. J.; Yoo, S. H.; Cho, J. J.; Caterson, I. D.; Song, H. J.

In: International Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 67, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 73-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kim, J. Y.

AU - Oh, Seung-June

AU - Chang, M. R.

AU - Cho, Y. G.

AU - Park, K. H.

AU - Paek, Y. J.

AU - Yoo, S. H.

AU - Cho, J. J.

AU - Caterson, I. D.

AU - Song, H. J.

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N2 - Background: Obesity is commonly assessed by body mass index (BMI) of which limitations come from an inability to distinguish body fat mass from lean mass. Several anthropometric measurements, including BMI, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio and waist-to-hip ratio have been used to predict metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of FMI or BF% combined with previous known anthropometric indices to assess the risk of metabolic syndrome in clinical practice. Methods: In 5534 men visiting a hospital for health check-ups, blood tests, anthropometric measurements and body composition analysis using BIA were performed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the odds ratios for metabolic syndrome and each component of metabolic syndrome among BMI, waist-to-height ratio, waist-to-hip ratio, FMI and BF%. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) for metabolic syndrome was compared between several measurements. The net reclassification improvement with integrated discrimination improvement was used for assessing value of body composition measurement. Results: The adjusted odds ratios of metabolic syndrome was 1.80 (95% CI, 1.71-1.89) for FMI and 1.15 (95% CI, 1.13-1.17) for BF%. Odds ratio of each metabolic component was highest for FMI among several anthropometric and body composition measurements. AUCs using the ROC curve for metabolic syndrome was highest for waist-to-height ratio, 0.823 (95% CI, 0.808-0.837) by National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. FMI caused a mild increase in integrated discrimination improvement when combined with waist-to-height ratio. Conclusions: Waist-to-height ratio seems to be the best screening tool for evaluating metabolic syndrome in Korean men, and adding FMI could result in a modest increase in integrated discrimination improvement.

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