Combined Associations of Physical Activity and Particulate Matter With Subsequent Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among 5-Year Cancer Survivors

Daein Choi, Seulggie Choi, Kyae Hyung Kim, Kyuwoong Kim, Jooyoung Chang, Sung Min Kim, Seong Rae Kim, Yoosun Cho, Gyeongsil Lee, Joung Sik Son, Sang Min Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The combined associations of physical activity and particulate matter (PM) with subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is yet unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study population consisted of 18 846 cancer survivors who survived for at least 5 years after initial cancer diagnosis from the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. Average PM levels for 4 years were determined in administrative district areas, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) information was acquired from health examination questionnaires. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the risk for CVD. Among patients with low PM with particles ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5; (19.8–25.6 μg/m3) exposure, ≥5 times per week of MVPA was associated with lower CVD risk (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60–0.99) compared with 0 times per week of MVPA. Also, a higher level of MVPA frequency was associated with lower CVD risk (P for trend=0.028) among cancer survivors who were exposed to low PM2.5 levels. In contrast, ≥5 times per week of MVPA among patients with high PM2.5 (25.8–33.8 μg/m3) exposure was not associated with lower CVD risk (aHR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79–1.21). Compared with patients with low PM2.5 and MVPA ≥3 times per week, low PM2.5 and MVPA ≤2 times per week (aHR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.03–1.55), high PM2.5 and MVPA ≥3 times per week (aHR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.07–1.67), and high PM2.5 and MVPA ≤2 times per week (aHR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.12–1.70) was associated with higher CVD risk. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer survivors who engaged in MVPA ≥5 times per week benefited from lower CVD risk upon low PM2.5 exposure. High levels of PM2.5 exposure may attenuate the risk-reducing effects of MVPA on the risk of CVD.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere022806
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 May 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cancer survivor
  • cardiovascular disease
  • exercise
  • particulate matter
  • physical activity

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