Clinical impact of renal coronal images from 16 multidetector spiral CT raw data: Comparison with axial images

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Abstract

Purpose: We evaluated the clinical usefulness of coronal reformatted renal images from raw 16 Multidetector Spiral CT (MDCT) data in the evaluation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients, who had undergone a nephrectomy, were studied, including 16 with renal cell carcinomas, 3 with transitional cell carcinomas and 2 with renal injuries due to renal trauma or a huge cyst rupture. The 5mm thickness summated axial and reformatted coronal renal CT images were retrospectively evaluated by two reviewers. Self-administered visual analogue scales were used to assess the subjective perception score in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy and anatomical perception of the renal lesions on the axial and coronal images, or both, respectively. The numbers of axial and coronal CT image cuts needed to evaluate the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions were also counted. Results: Although one reviewer showed no statistical difference in preference toward the axial and coronal images, or both (ANOVA, p=0.36), the other reviewer preferred the coronal or combined images to that of the axial images in evaluating the vascular anatomy (ANOVA, p<0.05). Less image cuts were needed in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in the coronal compared to the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Both the reviewers preferred the coronal or combined images in the anatomical perception of renal lesions (ANOVA, p<0.01). Also, in the perception of renal lesions, the coronal images needed less image cuts than the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Conclusions: Coronal reformatted renal images from raw MDCT data allow for the rapid and easy interpretation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-475
Number of pages5
JournalKorean Journal of Urology
Volume46
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1 May 2005

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Spiral Computed Tomography
Kidney
Blood Vessels
Anatomy
Analysis of Variance
Students
Transitional Cell Carcinoma
Wounds and Injuries
Nephrectomy
Visual Analog Scale
Renal Cell Carcinoma

Keywords

  • Anatomy
  • Kidney
  • Spiral computed
  • Tomography

Cite this

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title = "Clinical impact of renal coronal images from 16 multidetector spiral CT raw data: Comparison with axial images",
abstract = "Purpose: We evaluated the clinical usefulness of coronal reformatted renal images from raw 16 Multidetector Spiral CT (MDCT) data in the evaluation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients, who had undergone a nephrectomy, were studied, including 16 with renal cell carcinomas, 3 with transitional cell carcinomas and 2 with renal injuries due to renal trauma or a huge cyst rupture. The 5mm thickness summated axial and reformatted coronal renal CT images were retrospectively evaluated by two reviewers. Self-administered visual analogue scales were used to assess the subjective perception score in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy and anatomical perception of the renal lesions on the axial and coronal images, or both, respectively. The numbers of axial and coronal CT image cuts needed to evaluate the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions were also counted. Results: Although one reviewer showed no statistical difference in preference toward the axial and coronal images, or both (ANOVA, p=0.36), the other reviewer preferred the coronal or combined images to that of the axial images in evaluating the vascular anatomy (ANOVA, p<0.05). Less image cuts were needed in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in the coronal compared to the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Both the reviewers preferred the coronal or combined images in the anatomical perception of renal lesions (ANOVA, p<0.01). Also, in the perception of renal lesions, the coronal images needed less image cuts than the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Conclusions: Coronal reformatted renal images from raw MDCT data allow for the rapid and easy interpretation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions.",
keywords = "Anatomy, Kidney, Spiral computed, Tomography",
author = "Park, {Hyoung Keun} and Jeong, {Chang Wook} and Byun, {Seok Soo} and Lee, {Hak Jong} and Hwang, {Sung Il} and Kim, {Seung Hyup} and Lee, {Sang Eun}",
year = "2005",
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T1 - Clinical impact of renal coronal images from 16 multidetector spiral CT raw data

T2 - Comparison with axial images

AU - Park, Hyoung Keun

AU - Jeong, Chang Wook

AU - Byun, Seok Soo

AU - Lee, Hak Jong

AU - Hwang, Sung Il

AU - Kim, Seung Hyup

AU - Lee, Sang Eun

PY - 2005/5/1

Y1 - 2005/5/1

N2 - Purpose: We evaluated the clinical usefulness of coronal reformatted renal images from raw 16 Multidetector Spiral CT (MDCT) data in the evaluation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients, who had undergone a nephrectomy, were studied, including 16 with renal cell carcinomas, 3 with transitional cell carcinomas and 2 with renal injuries due to renal trauma or a huge cyst rupture. The 5mm thickness summated axial and reformatted coronal renal CT images were retrospectively evaluated by two reviewers. Self-administered visual analogue scales were used to assess the subjective perception score in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy and anatomical perception of the renal lesions on the axial and coronal images, or both, respectively. The numbers of axial and coronal CT image cuts needed to evaluate the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions were also counted. Results: Although one reviewer showed no statistical difference in preference toward the axial and coronal images, or both (ANOVA, p=0.36), the other reviewer preferred the coronal or combined images to that of the axial images in evaluating the vascular anatomy (ANOVA, p<0.05). Less image cuts were needed in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in the coronal compared to the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Both the reviewers preferred the coronal or combined images in the anatomical perception of renal lesions (ANOVA, p<0.01). Also, in the perception of renal lesions, the coronal images needed less image cuts than the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Conclusions: Coronal reformatted renal images from raw MDCT data allow for the rapid and easy interpretation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions.

AB - Purpose: We evaluated the clinical usefulness of coronal reformatted renal images from raw 16 Multidetector Spiral CT (MDCT) data in the evaluation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients, who had undergone a nephrectomy, were studied, including 16 with renal cell carcinomas, 3 with transitional cell carcinomas and 2 with renal injuries due to renal trauma or a huge cyst rupture. The 5mm thickness summated axial and reformatted coronal renal CT images were retrospectively evaluated by two reviewers. Self-administered visual analogue scales were used to assess the subjective perception score in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy and anatomical perception of the renal lesions on the axial and coronal images, or both, respectively. The numbers of axial and coronal CT image cuts needed to evaluate the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions were also counted. Results: Although one reviewer showed no statistical difference in preference toward the axial and coronal images, or both (ANOVA, p=0.36), the other reviewer preferred the coronal or combined images to that of the axial images in evaluating the vascular anatomy (ANOVA, p<0.05). Less image cuts were needed in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in the coronal compared to the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Both the reviewers preferred the coronal or combined images in the anatomical perception of renal lesions (ANOVA, p<0.01). Also, in the perception of renal lesions, the coronal images needed less image cuts than the axial images (Student's t-test (paired), p<0.01). Conclusions: Coronal reformatted renal images from raw MDCT data allow for the rapid and easy interpretation of the renal vascular anatomy and renal lesions.

KW - Anatomy

KW - Kidney

KW - Spiral computed

KW - Tomography

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JO - Korean Journal of Urology

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