Clinical characteristics and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after traumatic brain injury

Seong Ki Ahn, Sea Yuong Jeon, Jin Pyeong Kim, Jung Je Park, Dong Gu Hur, Dae Woo Kim, Seung Hoon Woo, Oh Jin Kwon, Jin Yong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been reported to be a common cause of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). However, only a few studies have investigated BPPV after TBI. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical characteristics of BPPV after TBI and to determine whether there are clinical differences between BPPV after TBI and idiopathic BPPV. Methods: The authors reviewed the medical records of 192 consecutive patients with positional vertigo after head injury during the period 2003 to 2009 and investigated 112 patients with idiopathic BPPV treated over the same period. The clinical characteristics of BPPV after BI and the clinical differences between the traumatic BPPV and idiopathic BPPV groups were investigated. Results: A total of 32 patients with BPPV after TBI fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four patients in the traumatic BPPV group had posterior semicircular canal-BPPV and 11 patients lateral semicircular canal-BPPV. A total of 58 repositioning maneuver sessions were performed in these 32 patients. Members of the traumatic BPPV group required more treatment sessions than members of the idiopathic group (p < 0.05), but no tendency to recur was observed in the traumatic group (p > 0.05). Recurrence rates in the traumatic and idiopathic BPPV groups were 15.6% and 18.8%, respectively (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that BPPV after TBI is more difficult to treat than idiopathic BPPV, but no tendency to recur was observed in patients who developed BPPV after TBI compared with idiopathic BPPV. Further prospective clinical meta-analytic studies are needed to investigate the outcome of BPPV after TBI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-446
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Therapeutics
Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Traumatic Brain Injury
Semicircular Canals
Vertigo
Craniocerebral Trauma
Medical Records
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
  • Therapy
  • Traumatic brain injury

Cite this

Ahn, Seong Ki ; Jeon, Sea Yuong ; Kim, Jin Pyeong ; Park, Jung Je ; Hur, Dong Gu ; Kim, Dae Woo ; Woo, Seung Hoon ; Kwon, Oh Jin ; Kim, Jin Yong. / Clinical characteristics and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after traumatic brain injury. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2011 ; Vol. 70, No. 2. pp. 442-446.
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abstract = "Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been reported to be a common cause of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). However, only a few studies have investigated BPPV after TBI. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical characteristics of BPPV after TBI and to determine whether there are clinical differences between BPPV after TBI and idiopathic BPPV. Methods: The authors reviewed the medical records of 192 consecutive patients with positional vertigo after head injury during the period 2003 to 2009 and investigated 112 patients with idiopathic BPPV treated over the same period. The clinical characteristics of BPPV after BI and the clinical differences between the traumatic BPPV and idiopathic BPPV groups were investigated. Results: A total of 32 patients with BPPV after TBI fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four patients in the traumatic BPPV group had posterior semicircular canal-BPPV and 11 patients lateral semicircular canal-BPPV. A total of 58 repositioning maneuver sessions were performed in these 32 patients. Members of the traumatic BPPV group required more treatment sessions than members of the idiopathic group (p < 0.05), but no tendency to recur was observed in the traumatic group (p > 0.05). Recurrence rates in the traumatic and idiopathic BPPV groups were 15.6{\%} and 18.8{\%}, respectively (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that BPPV after TBI is more difficult to treat than idiopathic BPPV, but no tendency to recur was observed in patients who developed BPPV after TBI compared with idiopathic BPPV. Further prospective clinical meta-analytic studies are needed to investigate the outcome of BPPV after TBI.",
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Clinical characteristics and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after traumatic brain injury. / Ahn, Seong Ki; Jeon, Sea Yuong; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Hur, Dong Gu; Kim, Dae Woo; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kwon, Oh Jin; Kim, Jin Yong.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 70, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 442-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical characteristics and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after traumatic brain injury

AU - Ahn, Seong Ki

AU - Jeon, Sea Yuong

AU - Kim, Jin Pyeong

AU - Park, Jung Je

AU - Hur, Dong Gu

AU - Kim, Dae Woo

AU - Woo, Seung Hoon

AU - Kwon, Oh Jin

AU - Kim, Jin Yong

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N2 - Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been reported to be a common cause of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). However, only a few studies have investigated BPPV after TBI. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical characteristics of BPPV after TBI and to determine whether there are clinical differences between BPPV after TBI and idiopathic BPPV. Methods: The authors reviewed the medical records of 192 consecutive patients with positional vertigo after head injury during the period 2003 to 2009 and investigated 112 patients with idiopathic BPPV treated over the same period. The clinical characteristics of BPPV after BI and the clinical differences between the traumatic BPPV and idiopathic BPPV groups were investigated. Results: A total of 32 patients with BPPV after TBI fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four patients in the traumatic BPPV group had posterior semicircular canal-BPPV and 11 patients lateral semicircular canal-BPPV. A total of 58 repositioning maneuver sessions were performed in these 32 patients. Members of the traumatic BPPV group required more treatment sessions than members of the idiopathic group (p < 0.05), but no tendency to recur was observed in the traumatic group (p > 0.05). Recurrence rates in the traumatic and idiopathic BPPV groups were 15.6% and 18.8%, respectively (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that BPPV after TBI is more difficult to treat than idiopathic BPPV, but no tendency to recur was observed in patients who developed BPPV after TBI compared with idiopathic BPPV. Further prospective clinical meta-analytic studies are needed to investigate the outcome of BPPV after TBI.

AB - Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been reported to be a common cause of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). However, only a few studies have investigated BPPV after TBI. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical characteristics of BPPV after TBI and to determine whether there are clinical differences between BPPV after TBI and idiopathic BPPV. Methods: The authors reviewed the medical records of 192 consecutive patients with positional vertigo after head injury during the period 2003 to 2009 and investigated 112 patients with idiopathic BPPV treated over the same period. The clinical characteristics of BPPV after BI and the clinical differences between the traumatic BPPV and idiopathic BPPV groups were investigated. Results: A total of 32 patients with BPPV after TBI fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four patients in the traumatic BPPV group had posterior semicircular canal-BPPV and 11 patients lateral semicircular canal-BPPV. A total of 58 repositioning maneuver sessions were performed in these 32 patients. Members of the traumatic BPPV group required more treatment sessions than members of the idiopathic group (p < 0.05), but no tendency to recur was observed in the traumatic group (p > 0.05). Recurrence rates in the traumatic and idiopathic BPPV groups were 15.6% and 18.8%, respectively (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that BPPV after TBI is more difficult to treat than idiopathic BPPV, but no tendency to recur was observed in patients who developed BPPV after TBI compared with idiopathic BPPV. Further prospective clinical meta-analytic studies are needed to investigate the outcome of BPPV after TBI.

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