Characteristics of diet patterns in metabolically obese, normal weight adults (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 2005)

J. Choi, O. Se-Young, D. Lee, S. Tak, M. Hong, S. M. Park, B. Cho, M. Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: Metabolically obese normal weight (MONW) subjects are a subgroup of individuals who have a normal weight and body mass index (BMI), but exhibit obesity-related abnormalities. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and characteristics of diet patterns in MONW Koreans. Methods and results: We analyzed the data of 3050 adults > 20 years of age with a normal BMI (18.5∼24.9 kg/m 2) obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. Anthropometric measurements and information on health behaviors were obtained. The diagnostic criteria for MetS were defined by the International Diabetes Federation consensus. Dietary intake was assessed by the 24-h recall method. The weighted prevalence of MONW was 14.3%. The risk of MONW correlated inversely with the frequency of snacking and positively with the type of snack, particularly those with high carbohydrates.A high carbohydrate diet (≥73.9% of energy intake) compared to a low carbohydrate diet (<59.9% of energy intake) was positively associated with the risk of MONW (OR = 2.54; 95% CI: 1.41, 4.56), whereas a high protein diet (≥17.1% of energy intake) compared to a low protein diet (<12.2% of energy intake) reduced the risk of MONW (OR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.92) in females, but not in males. Conclusions: This study suggests that a reduced intake of carbohydrates and carbohydrate snacks were associated with a lower prevalence of MONW in females.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)567-574
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2012

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
Diet
Weights and Measures
Energy Intake
Snacks
Carbohydrates
Body Mass Index
Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
Protein-Restricted Diet
Health Behavior
Korea
Consensus
Obesity

Keywords

  • Diet patterns
  • Macronutrient composition
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Metabolically obese normal weight

Cite this

@article{bb4b7be757454c63916aad30eab06e8f,
title = "Characteristics of diet patterns in metabolically obese, normal weight adults (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 2005)",
abstract = "Background and aims: Metabolically obese normal weight (MONW) subjects are a subgroup of individuals who have a normal weight and body mass index (BMI), but exhibit obesity-related abnormalities. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and characteristics of diet patterns in MONW Koreans. Methods and results: We analyzed the data of 3050 adults > 20 years of age with a normal BMI (18.5∼24.9 kg/m 2) obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. Anthropometric measurements and information on health behaviors were obtained. The diagnostic criteria for MetS were defined by the International Diabetes Federation consensus. Dietary intake was assessed by the 24-h recall method. The weighted prevalence of MONW was 14.3{\%}. The risk of MONW correlated inversely with the frequency of snacking and positively with the type of snack, particularly those with high carbohydrates.A high carbohydrate diet (≥73.9{\%} of energy intake) compared to a low carbohydrate diet (<59.9{\%} of energy intake) was positively associated with the risk of MONW (OR = 2.54; 95{\%} CI: 1.41, 4.56), whereas a high protein diet (≥17.1{\%} of energy intake) compared to a low protein diet (<12.2{\%} of energy intake) reduced the risk of MONW (OR = 0.60; 95{\%} CI: 0.39, 0.92) in females, but not in males. Conclusions: This study suggests that a reduced intake of carbohydrates and carbohydrate snacks were associated with a lower prevalence of MONW in females.",
keywords = "Diet patterns, Macronutrient composition, Metabolic syndrome, Metabolically obese normal weight",
author = "J. Choi and O. Se-Young and D. Lee and S. Tak and M. Hong and Park, {S. M.} and B. Cho and M. Park",
year = "2012",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.numecd.2010.09.001",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "567--574",
journal = "Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases",
issn = "0939-4753",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characteristics of diet patterns in metabolically obese, normal weight adults (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 2005)

AU - Choi, J.

AU - Se-Young, O.

AU - Lee, D.

AU - Tak, S.

AU - Hong, M.

AU - Park, S. M.

AU - Cho, B.

AU - Park, M.

PY - 2012/7/1

Y1 - 2012/7/1

N2 - Background and aims: Metabolically obese normal weight (MONW) subjects are a subgroup of individuals who have a normal weight and body mass index (BMI), but exhibit obesity-related abnormalities. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and characteristics of diet patterns in MONW Koreans. Methods and results: We analyzed the data of 3050 adults > 20 years of age with a normal BMI (18.5∼24.9 kg/m 2) obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. Anthropometric measurements and information on health behaviors were obtained. The diagnostic criteria for MetS were defined by the International Diabetes Federation consensus. Dietary intake was assessed by the 24-h recall method. The weighted prevalence of MONW was 14.3%. The risk of MONW correlated inversely with the frequency of snacking and positively with the type of snack, particularly those with high carbohydrates.A high carbohydrate diet (≥73.9% of energy intake) compared to a low carbohydrate diet (<59.9% of energy intake) was positively associated with the risk of MONW (OR = 2.54; 95% CI: 1.41, 4.56), whereas a high protein diet (≥17.1% of energy intake) compared to a low protein diet (<12.2% of energy intake) reduced the risk of MONW (OR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.92) in females, but not in males. Conclusions: This study suggests that a reduced intake of carbohydrates and carbohydrate snacks were associated with a lower prevalence of MONW in females.

AB - Background and aims: Metabolically obese normal weight (MONW) subjects are a subgroup of individuals who have a normal weight and body mass index (BMI), but exhibit obesity-related abnormalities. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and characteristics of diet patterns in MONW Koreans. Methods and results: We analyzed the data of 3050 adults > 20 years of age with a normal BMI (18.5∼24.9 kg/m 2) obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. Anthropometric measurements and information on health behaviors were obtained. The diagnostic criteria for MetS were defined by the International Diabetes Federation consensus. Dietary intake was assessed by the 24-h recall method. The weighted prevalence of MONW was 14.3%. The risk of MONW correlated inversely with the frequency of snacking and positively with the type of snack, particularly those with high carbohydrates.A high carbohydrate diet (≥73.9% of energy intake) compared to a low carbohydrate diet (<59.9% of energy intake) was positively associated with the risk of MONW (OR = 2.54; 95% CI: 1.41, 4.56), whereas a high protein diet (≥17.1% of energy intake) compared to a low protein diet (<12.2% of energy intake) reduced the risk of MONW (OR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.92) in females, but not in males. Conclusions: This study suggests that a reduced intake of carbohydrates and carbohydrate snacks were associated with a lower prevalence of MONW in females.

KW - Diet patterns

KW - Macronutrient composition

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Metabolically obese normal weight

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862126203&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.numecd.2010.09.001

DO - 10.1016/j.numecd.2010.09.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 21186103

AN - SCOPUS:84862126203

VL - 22

SP - 567

EP - 574

JO - Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

JF - Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

SN - 0939-4753

IS - 7

ER -