Caregiver burden, patients' self-perceived burden, and preference for palliative care among cancer patients and caregivers

Ji Eun Lee, Dong Wook Shin, Juhee Cho, Hyung Kook Yang, So Young Kim, Hyo Sang Yoo, Hyun Jung Jho, Joo Yeon Shin, Belong Cho, Keeho Park, Jong Hyock Park

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20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Recently, caregiver burden (CB) has emerged as an important issue in the area of palliative medicine. However, patients' feelings related to being a burden to their families (i.e., self-perceived burden [SPB]) is also a significant issue. We evaluated the relation of CB and SPB as preference for palliative care. Methods A national, multicenter, cross-sectional survey of 326 patient-caregiver dyads was performed. A set of paired questionnaires evaluating CB and SPB (five domain items assessed on a four-point Likert scale) were independently administered to patients and their caregivers. Among the respondents, only the patients with distant stage cancer and their caregivers were included. Multivariate analyses were conducted to identify the associations between CB and SPB and preference for palliative care. Results Caregivers and patients who preferred palliative care to life sustaining treatment reported higher CB and SPB scores, respectively. Caregivers who felt more of a burden were more likely to prefer palliative care over life sustaining treatment for their patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.21-2.31). In addition, patients who perceived their caregivers' burden as large tended to prefer palliative care (aOR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.16-2.22). Conclusions Both CB and SPB increased preference for palliative care. This could be interpreted that high CB can lead to preference for palliative care in both patients and their caregivers, potentially threatening patient autonomy. Efforts to relieve CB and SPB are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1545-1551
Number of pages7
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2015

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Palliative Care
Caregivers
Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Emotions
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies

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Lee, J. E., Shin, D. W., Cho, J., Yang, H. K., Kim, S. Y., Yoo, H. S., ... Park, J. H. (2015). Caregiver burden, patients' self-perceived burden, and preference for palliative care among cancer patients and caregivers. Psycho-Oncology, 24(11), 1545-1551. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.3827
Lee, Ji Eun ; Shin, Dong Wook ; Cho, Juhee ; Yang, Hyung Kook ; Kim, So Young ; Yoo, Hyo Sang ; Jho, Hyun Jung ; Shin, Joo Yeon ; Cho, Belong ; Park, Keeho ; Park, Jong Hyock. / Caregiver burden, patients' self-perceived burden, and preference for palliative care among cancer patients and caregivers. In: Psycho-Oncology. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 11. pp. 1545-1551.
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title = "Caregiver burden, patients' self-perceived burden, and preference for palliative care among cancer patients and caregivers",
abstract = "Objective Recently, caregiver burden (CB) has emerged as an important issue in the area of palliative medicine. However, patients' feelings related to being a burden to their families (i.e., self-perceived burden [SPB]) is also a significant issue. We evaluated the relation of CB and SPB as preference for palliative care. Methods A national, multicenter, cross-sectional survey of 326 patient-caregiver dyads was performed. A set of paired questionnaires evaluating CB and SPB (five domain items assessed on a four-point Likert scale) were independently administered to patients and their caregivers. Among the respondents, only the patients with distant stage cancer and their caregivers were included. Multivariate analyses were conducted to identify the associations between CB and SPB and preference for palliative care. Results Caregivers and patients who preferred palliative care to life sustaining treatment reported higher CB and SPB scores, respectively. Caregivers who felt more of a burden were more likely to prefer palliative care over life sustaining treatment for their patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.67, 95{\%} CI: 1.21-2.31). In addition, patients who perceived their caregivers' burden as large tended to prefer palliative care (aOR = 1.61, 95{\%} CI: 1.16-2.22). Conclusions Both CB and SPB increased preference for palliative care. This could be interpreted that high CB can lead to preference for palliative care in both patients and their caregivers, potentially threatening patient autonomy. Efforts to relieve CB and SPB are needed.",
author = "Lee, {Ji Eun} and Shin, {Dong Wook} and Juhee Cho and Yang, {Hyung Kook} and Kim, {So Young} and Yoo, {Hyo Sang} and Jho, {Hyun Jung} and Shin, {Joo Yeon} and Belong Cho and Keeho Park and Park, {Jong Hyock}",
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Lee, JE, Shin, DW, Cho, J, Yang, HK, Kim, SY, Yoo, HS, Jho, HJ, Shin, JY, Cho, B, Park, K & Park, JH 2015, 'Caregiver burden, patients' self-perceived burden, and preference for palliative care among cancer patients and caregivers', Psycho-Oncology, vol. 24, no. 11, pp. 1545-1551. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.3827

Caregiver burden, patients' self-perceived burden, and preference for palliative care among cancer patients and caregivers. / Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Dong Wook; Cho, Juhee; Yang, Hyung Kook; Kim, So Young; Yoo, Hyo Sang; Jho, Hyun Jung; Shin, Joo Yeon; Cho, Belong; Park, Keeho; Park, Jong Hyock.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 24, No. 11, 01.11.2015, p. 1545-1551.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Caregiver burden, patients' self-perceived burden, and preference for palliative care among cancer patients and caregivers

AU - Lee, Ji Eun

AU - Shin, Dong Wook

AU - Cho, Juhee

AU - Yang, Hyung Kook

AU - Kim, So Young

AU - Yoo, Hyo Sang

AU - Jho, Hyun Jung

AU - Shin, Joo Yeon

AU - Cho, Belong

AU - Park, Keeho

AU - Park, Jong Hyock

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Objective Recently, caregiver burden (CB) has emerged as an important issue in the area of palliative medicine. However, patients' feelings related to being a burden to their families (i.e., self-perceived burden [SPB]) is also a significant issue. We evaluated the relation of CB and SPB as preference for palliative care. Methods A national, multicenter, cross-sectional survey of 326 patient-caregiver dyads was performed. A set of paired questionnaires evaluating CB and SPB (five domain items assessed on a four-point Likert scale) were independently administered to patients and their caregivers. Among the respondents, only the patients with distant stage cancer and their caregivers were included. Multivariate analyses were conducted to identify the associations between CB and SPB and preference for palliative care. Results Caregivers and patients who preferred palliative care to life sustaining treatment reported higher CB and SPB scores, respectively. Caregivers who felt more of a burden were more likely to prefer palliative care over life sustaining treatment for their patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.21-2.31). In addition, patients who perceived their caregivers' burden as large tended to prefer palliative care (aOR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.16-2.22). Conclusions Both CB and SPB increased preference for palliative care. This could be interpreted that high CB can lead to preference for palliative care in both patients and their caregivers, potentially threatening patient autonomy. Efforts to relieve CB and SPB are needed.

AB - Objective Recently, caregiver burden (CB) has emerged as an important issue in the area of palliative medicine. However, patients' feelings related to being a burden to their families (i.e., self-perceived burden [SPB]) is also a significant issue. We evaluated the relation of CB and SPB as preference for palliative care. Methods A national, multicenter, cross-sectional survey of 326 patient-caregiver dyads was performed. A set of paired questionnaires evaluating CB and SPB (five domain items assessed on a four-point Likert scale) were independently administered to patients and their caregivers. Among the respondents, only the patients with distant stage cancer and their caregivers were included. Multivariate analyses were conducted to identify the associations between CB and SPB and preference for palliative care. Results Caregivers and patients who preferred palliative care to life sustaining treatment reported higher CB and SPB scores, respectively. Caregivers who felt more of a burden were more likely to prefer palliative care over life sustaining treatment for their patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.21-2.31). In addition, patients who perceived their caregivers' burden as large tended to prefer palliative care (aOR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.16-2.22). Conclusions Both CB and SPB increased preference for palliative care. This could be interpreted that high CB can lead to preference for palliative care in both patients and their caregivers, potentially threatening patient autonomy. Efforts to relieve CB and SPB are needed.

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