Cancer pain management education rectifies patients’ misconceptions of cancer pain, reduces pain, and improves quality of life

Su Jin Koh, Bhumsuk Keam, Min Kyung Hyun, Jeong Ju Seo, Keon Uk Park, Sung Yong Oh, Jinseok Ahn, Ja Youn Lee, Jin Shil Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients’ misconceptions regarding cancer pain. Design. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. Results. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3% were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0%), colon cancer (15.9%), and breast cancer (12.5%). The subjects’ reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N=13, 7.4%). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P < 0.001). The outpatients showed more use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain. Sleep quality change was most significantly associated with intervention; other quality of life aspects (e.g., general feelings and life enjoyment) also improved. Pain education also significantly reduced misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. Conclusions. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients’ misconceptions about analgesic use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2546-2555
Number of pages10
JournalPain Medicine (United States)
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Breakthrough Pain
Patient Education
Pain Management
Short-Acting Analgesics
Quality of Life
Pain
Education
Outpatients
Colonic Neoplasms
Inpatients
Lung Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Opioid Analgesics
Analgesics
Cancer Pain
Sleep
Emotions
Research Design

Keywords

  • Breakthrough cancer pain
  • Educational intervention
  • Pain control

Cite this

Koh, Su Jin ; Keam, Bhumsuk ; Hyun, Min Kyung ; Seo, Jeong Ju ; Park, Keon Uk ; Oh, Sung Yong ; Ahn, Jinseok ; Lee, Ja Youn ; Kim, Jin Shil. / Cancer pain management education rectifies patients’ misconceptions of cancer pain, reduces pain, and improves quality of life. In: Pain Medicine (United States). 2018 ; Vol. 19, No. 12. pp. 2546-2555.
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abstract = "Objectives. More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients’ misconceptions regarding cancer pain. Design. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. Results. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3{\%} were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0{\%}), colon cancer (15.9{\%}), and breast cancer (12.5{\%}). The subjects’ reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N=13, 7.4{\%}). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P < 0.001). The outpatients showed more use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain. Sleep quality change was most significantly associated with intervention; other quality of life aspects (e.g., general feelings and life enjoyment) also improved. Pain education also significantly reduced misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. Conclusions. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients’ misconceptions about analgesic use.",
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Cancer pain management education rectifies patients’ misconceptions of cancer pain, reduces pain, and improves quality of life. / Koh, Su Jin; Keam, Bhumsuk; Hyun, Min Kyung; Seo, Jeong Ju; Park, Keon Uk; Oh, Sung Yong; Ahn, Jinseok; Lee, Ja Youn; Kim, Jin Shil.

In: Pain Medicine (United States), Vol. 19, No. 12, 01.01.2018, p. 2546-2555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Koh, Su Jin

AU - Keam, Bhumsuk

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AU - Seo, Jeong Ju

AU - Park, Keon Uk

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AB - Objectives. More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients’ misconceptions regarding cancer pain. Design. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. Results. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3% were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0%), colon cancer (15.9%), and breast cancer (12.5%). The subjects’ reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N=13, 7.4%). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P < 0.001). The outpatients showed more use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain. Sleep quality change was most significantly associated with intervention; other quality of life aspects (e.g., general feelings and life enjoyment) also improved. Pain education also significantly reduced misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. Conclusions. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients’ misconceptions about analgesic use.

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