Brain-computer interfaces using capacitive measurement of visual or auditory steady-state responses

Hyun Jae Baek, Hyun Seok Kim, Jeong Heo, Yong Gyu Lim, Kwangsuk Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have been intensely studied to provide alternative communication tools entirely independent of neuromuscular activities. Current BCI technologies use electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition methods that require unpleasant gel injections, impractical preparations and clean-up procedures. The next generation of BCI technologies requires practical, user-friendly, nonintrusive EEG platforms in order to facilitate the application of laboratory work in real-world settings. Approach. A capacitive electrode that does not require an electrolytic gel or direct electrode-scalp contact is a potential alternative to the conventional wet electrode in future BCI systems. We have proposed a new capacitive EEG electrode that contains a conductive polymer-sensing surface, which enhances electrode performance. This paper presents results from five subjects who exhibited visual or auditory steady-state responses according to BCI using these new capacitive electrodes. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) spelling system and the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) binary decision system were employed. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated BCI performance high enough to be used in a BCI system (accuracy: 95.2%, ITR: 19.91 bpm for SSVEP BCI (6 s), accuracy: 82.6%, ITR: 1.48 bpm for ASSR BCI (14 s)) with the analysis time being slightly longer than that when wet electrodes were employed with the same BCI system (accuracy: 91.2%, ITR: 25.79 bpm for SSVEP BCI (4 s), accuracy: 81.3%, ITR: 1.57 bpm for ASSR BCI (12 s)). Subjects performed online BCI under the SSVEP paradigm in copy spelling mode and under the ASSR paradigm in selective attention mode with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 17.78 ± 2.08 and 0.7 ± 0.24 bpm, respectively. Significance. The results of these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using our capacitive EEG electrode in BCI systems. This capacitive electrode may become a flexible and non-intrusive tool fit for various applications in the next generation of BCI technologies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number024001
JournalJournal of Neural Engineering
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2013

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Brain-Computer Interfaces
Brain computer interface
Electrodes
Visual Evoked Potentials
Bioelectric potentials
Computer Systems
Electroencephalography
Technology
Gels
Scalp

Cite this

@article{4519525501b54375a64503e92c23fc8b,
title = "Brain-computer interfaces using capacitive measurement of visual or auditory steady-state responses",
abstract = "Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have been intensely studied to provide alternative communication tools entirely independent of neuromuscular activities. Current BCI technologies use electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition methods that require unpleasant gel injections, impractical preparations and clean-up procedures. The next generation of BCI technologies requires practical, user-friendly, nonintrusive EEG platforms in order to facilitate the application of laboratory work in real-world settings. Approach. A capacitive electrode that does not require an electrolytic gel or direct electrode-scalp contact is a potential alternative to the conventional wet electrode in future BCI systems. We have proposed a new capacitive EEG electrode that contains a conductive polymer-sensing surface, which enhances electrode performance. This paper presents results from five subjects who exhibited visual or auditory steady-state responses according to BCI using these new capacitive electrodes. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) spelling system and the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) binary decision system were employed. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated BCI performance high enough to be used in a BCI system (accuracy: 95.2{\%}, ITR: 19.91 bpm for SSVEP BCI (6 s), accuracy: 82.6{\%}, ITR: 1.48 bpm for ASSR BCI (14 s)) with the analysis time being slightly longer than that when wet electrodes were employed with the same BCI system (accuracy: 91.2{\%}, ITR: 25.79 bpm for SSVEP BCI (4 s), accuracy: 81.3{\%}, ITR: 1.57 bpm for ASSR BCI (12 s)). Subjects performed online BCI under the SSVEP paradigm in copy spelling mode and under the ASSR paradigm in selective attention mode with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 17.78 ± 2.08 and 0.7 ± 0.24 bpm, respectively. Significance. The results of these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using our capacitive EEG electrode in BCI systems. This capacitive electrode may become a flexible and non-intrusive tool fit for various applications in the next generation of BCI technologies.",
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Brain-computer interfaces using capacitive measurement of visual or auditory steady-state responses. / Baek, Hyun Jae; Kim, Hyun Seok; Heo, Jeong; Lim, Yong Gyu; Park, Kwangsuk.

In: Journal of Neural Engineering, Vol. 10, No. 2, 024001, 01.04.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Lim, Yong Gyu

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N2 - Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have been intensely studied to provide alternative communication tools entirely independent of neuromuscular activities. Current BCI technologies use electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition methods that require unpleasant gel injections, impractical preparations and clean-up procedures. The next generation of BCI technologies requires practical, user-friendly, nonintrusive EEG platforms in order to facilitate the application of laboratory work in real-world settings. Approach. A capacitive electrode that does not require an electrolytic gel or direct electrode-scalp contact is a potential alternative to the conventional wet electrode in future BCI systems. We have proposed a new capacitive EEG electrode that contains a conductive polymer-sensing surface, which enhances electrode performance. This paper presents results from five subjects who exhibited visual or auditory steady-state responses according to BCI using these new capacitive electrodes. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) spelling system and the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) binary decision system were employed. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated BCI performance high enough to be used in a BCI system (accuracy: 95.2%, ITR: 19.91 bpm for SSVEP BCI (6 s), accuracy: 82.6%, ITR: 1.48 bpm for ASSR BCI (14 s)) with the analysis time being slightly longer than that when wet electrodes were employed with the same BCI system (accuracy: 91.2%, ITR: 25.79 bpm for SSVEP BCI (4 s), accuracy: 81.3%, ITR: 1.57 bpm for ASSR BCI (12 s)). Subjects performed online BCI under the SSVEP paradigm in copy spelling mode and under the ASSR paradigm in selective attention mode with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 17.78 ± 2.08 and 0.7 ± 0.24 bpm, respectively. Significance. The results of these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using our capacitive EEG electrode in BCI systems. This capacitive electrode may become a flexible and non-intrusive tool fit for various applications in the next generation of BCI technologies.

AB - Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have been intensely studied to provide alternative communication tools entirely independent of neuromuscular activities. Current BCI technologies use electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition methods that require unpleasant gel injections, impractical preparations and clean-up procedures. The next generation of BCI technologies requires practical, user-friendly, nonintrusive EEG platforms in order to facilitate the application of laboratory work in real-world settings. Approach. A capacitive electrode that does not require an electrolytic gel or direct electrode-scalp contact is a potential alternative to the conventional wet electrode in future BCI systems. We have proposed a new capacitive EEG electrode that contains a conductive polymer-sensing surface, which enhances electrode performance. This paper presents results from five subjects who exhibited visual or auditory steady-state responses according to BCI using these new capacitive electrodes. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) spelling system and the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) binary decision system were employed. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated BCI performance high enough to be used in a BCI system (accuracy: 95.2%, ITR: 19.91 bpm for SSVEP BCI (6 s), accuracy: 82.6%, ITR: 1.48 bpm for ASSR BCI (14 s)) with the analysis time being slightly longer than that when wet electrodes were employed with the same BCI system (accuracy: 91.2%, ITR: 25.79 bpm for SSVEP BCI (4 s), accuracy: 81.3%, ITR: 1.57 bpm for ASSR BCI (12 s)). Subjects performed online BCI under the SSVEP paradigm in copy spelling mode and under the ASSR paradigm in selective attention mode with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 17.78 ± 2.08 and 0.7 ± 0.24 bpm, respectively. Significance. The results of these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using our capacitive EEG electrode in BCI systems. This capacitive electrode may become a flexible and non-intrusive tool fit for various applications in the next generation of BCI technologies.

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