Body weight gain rather than body weight variability associated with increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Weight loss, the most established therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is frequently followed by weight regain and fluctuation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether body weight change and variability were independent risk factors for incident NAFLD. We conducted a longitudinal cohort study. Among the 1907 participants, incident NAFLD occurred in 420 (22.0%) cases during median follow-up of 5.6 years. In the multivariate analysis, there was no significant association between weight variability and the risk of incident NAFLD. The risk of incident NAFLD was significantly higher in subjects with weight gain ≥ 10% and 7% < gain ≤ 10% [hazard ratios (HR), 2.43; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.65–3.58 and HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.26–2.39, respectively], while the risk of incident NAFLD was significantly lower in those with −7% < weight loss ≤ -−3% (HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.22–0.51). Overall body weight gain rather than bodyweight variability was independently associated with the risk of incident NAFLD. Understanding the association between body weight variability and incident NAFLD may have future clinical implications for the quantification of weight loss as a treatment for patients with NAFLD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number14428
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Body weight gain rather than body weight variability associated with increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this