Body composition changes with age have gender-specific impacts on bone mineral density

Soo Lim, Hyojee Joung, Chan Soo Shin, Hong Kyu Lee, Ki Sook Kim, Eun Kyung Shin, Hee Young Kim, Min Kyung Lim, Sung Il Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Body weight, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and diet have been proven to affect bone mineral density (BMD) directly or indirectly. Of these, body weight is perhaps best known to affect BMD. However, there is some debate as to whether lean body mass (LBM) or fat mass (FM), the two components of body weight, most determines BMD. Recently, newer peripheral densitometry devices have been developed, which have the advantages of low cost and portability, and this has made field epidemiologic study of osteoporosis possible. As the number of studies that have focused on the contribution made by body composition to BMD is limited, we investigated the relative contribution of LBM and FM to BMD in healthy Korean subjects. 402 age- and weight-matched subjects over 45 years old were selected from a population-based cohort. The mean ages of men and women were 64.1 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD) and 64.2 ± 12.7 years, and mean weights were 63.0 ± 8.2 and 63.1 ± 8.2 kg, respectively. BMD was measured by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Sociodemographic characteristics and physical activities were investigated using a standard questionnaire delivered by face-to-face interview. BMDs were 0.48 ± 0.01 and 0.37 ± 0.11 g/cm2 in men and women, respectively. In men, age, weight, body mass index (BMI), LBM, FM, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, and education were significantly correlated with BMD. In women, age, weight, BMI, LBM, FM, education, years since menopause, number of deliveries, and number of children breast-fed were significantly correlated with BMD. By multiple regression, LBM, education, smoking, and alcohol in men, and age, LBM, FM, smoking, and number of delivery in women were independent determinants of BMD. LBM was an important contributor for BMD in men, but both LBM and FM were equally important contributors in female to BMD. This stems from the fact that body composition changes with age differ in men and women. Thus, the augmentation of muscle mass in men and the maintenance of an optimal weight in women act to prevent osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)792-798
Number of pages7
JournalBone
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2004

Fingerprint

Body Composition
Bone Density
Fats
Weights and Measures
Smoking
Body Weight
Alcohols
Exercise
Education
Osteoporosis
Body Mass Index
Densitometry
Photon Absorptiometry
Menopause
Electric Impedance
Epidemiologic Studies
Healthy Volunteers
Breast
Maintenance
Interviews

Keywords

  • Bone mineral density
  • Fat mass
  • Lean body mass
  • Peripheral densitometry

Cite this

Lim, Soo ; Joung, Hyojee ; Shin, Chan Soo ; Lee, Hong Kyu ; Kim, Ki Sook ; Shin, Eun Kyung ; Kim, Hee Young ; Lim, Min Kyung ; Cho, Sung Il. / Body composition changes with age have gender-specific impacts on bone mineral density. In: Bone. 2004 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 792-798.
@article{d7c5ab125cb2440daaa0370e444983d3,
title = "Body composition changes with age have gender-specific impacts on bone mineral density",
abstract = "Body weight, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and diet have been proven to affect bone mineral density (BMD) directly or indirectly. Of these, body weight is perhaps best known to affect BMD. However, there is some debate as to whether lean body mass (LBM) or fat mass (FM), the two components of body weight, most determines BMD. Recently, newer peripheral densitometry devices have been developed, which have the advantages of low cost and portability, and this has made field epidemiologic study of osteoporosis possible. As the number of studies that have focused on the contribution made by body composition to BMD is limited, we investigated the relative contribution of LBM and FM to BMD in healthy Korean subjects. 402 age- and weight-matched subjects over 45 years old were selected from a population-based cohort. The mean ages of men and women were 64.1 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD) and 64.2 ± 12.7 years, and mean weights were 63.0 ± 8.2 and 63.1 ± 8.2 kg, respectively. BMD was measured by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Sociodemographic characteristics and physical activities were investigated using a standard questionnaire delivered by face-to-face interview. BMDs were 0.48 ± 0.01 and 0.37 ± 0.11 g/cm2 in men and women, respectively. In men, age, weight, body mass index (BMI), LBM, FM, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, and education were significantly correlated with BMD. In women, age, weight, BMI, LBM, FM, education, years since menopause, number of deliveries, and number of children breast-fed were significantly correlated with BMD. By multiple regression, LBM, education, smoking, and alcohol in men, and age, LBM, FM, smoking, and number of delivery in women were independent determinants of BMD. LBM was an important contributor for BMD in men, but both LBM and FM were equally important contributors in female to BMD. This stems from the fact that body composition changes with age differ in men and women. Thus, the augmentation of muscle mass in men and the maintenance of an optimal weight in women act to prevent osteoporosis.",
keywords = "Bone mineral density, Fat mass, Lean body mass, Peripheral densitometry",
author = "Soo Lim and Hyojee Joung and Shin, {Chan Soo} and Lee, {Hong Kyu} and Kim, {Ki Sook} and Shin, {Eun Kyung} and Kim, {Hee Young} and Lim, {Min Kyung} and Cho, {Sung Il}",
year = "2004",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bone.2004.05.016",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "792--798",
journal = "Bone",
issn = "8756-3282",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Lim, S, Joung, H, Shin, CS, Lee, HK, Kim, KS, Shin, EK, Kim, HY, Lim, MK & Cho, SI 2004, 'Body composition changes with age have gender-specific impacts on bone mineral density', Bone, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 792-798. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2004.05.016

Body composition changes with age have gender-specific impacts on bone mineral density. / Lim, Soo; Joung, Hyojee; Shin, Chan Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Kim, Ki Sook; Shin, Eun Kyung; Kim, Hee Young; Lim, Min Kyung; Cho, Sung Il.

In: Bone, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.09.2004, p. 792-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Body composition changes with age have gender-specific impacts on bone mineral density

AU - Lim, Soo

AU - Joung, Hyojee

AU - Shin, Chan Soo

AU - Lee, Hong Kyu

AU - Kim, Ki Sook

AU - Shin, Eun Kyung

AU - Kim, Hee Young

AU - Lim, Min Kyung

AU - Cho, Sung Il

PY - 2004/9/1

Y1 - 2004/9/1

N2 - Body weight, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and diet have been proven to affect bone mineral density (BMD) directly or indirectly. Of these, body weight is perhaps best known to affect BMD. However, there is some debate as to whether lean body mass (LBM) or fat mass (FM), the two components of body weight, most determines BMD. Recently, newer peripheral densitometry devices have been developed, which have the advantages of low cost and portability, and this has made field epidemiologic study of osteoporosis possible. As the number of studies that have focused on the contribution made by body composition to BMD is limited, we investigated the relative contribution of LBM and FM to BMD in healthy Korean subjects. 402 age- and weight-matched subjects over 45 years old were selected from a population-based cohort. The mean ages of men and women were 64.1 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD) and 64.2 ± 12.7 years, and mean weights were 63.0 ± 8.2 and 63.1 ± 8.2 kg, respectively. BMD was measured by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Sociodemographic characteristics and physical activities were investigated using a standard questionnaire delivered by face-to-face interview. BMDs were 0.48 ± 0.01 and 0.37 ± 0.11 g/cm2 in men and women, respectively. In men, age, weight, body mass index (BMI), LBM, FM, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, and education were significantly correlated with BMD. In women, age, weight, BMI, LBM, FM, education, years since menopause, number of deliveries, and number of children breast-fed were significantly correlated with BMD. By multiple regression, LBM, education, smoking, and alcohol in men, and age, LBM, FM, smoking, and number of delivery in women were independent determinants of BMD. LBM was an important contributor for BMD in men, but both LBM and FM were equally important contributors in female to BMD. This stems from the fact that body composition changes with age differ in men and women. Thus, the augmentation of muscle mass in men and the maintenance of an optimal weight in women act to prevent osteoporosis.

AB - Body weight, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and diet have been proven to affect bone mineral density (BMD) directly or indirectly. Of these, body weight is perhaps best known to affect BMD. However, there is some debate as to whether lean body mass (LBM) or fat mass (FM), the two components of body weight, most determines BMD. Recently, newer peripheral densitometry devices have been developed, which have the advantages of low cost and portability, and this has made field epidemiologic study of osteoporosis possible. As the number of studies that have focused on the contribution made by body composition to BMD is limited, we investigated the relative contribution of LBM and FM to BMD in healthy Korean subjects. 402 age- and weight-matched subjects over 45 years old were selected from a population-based cohort. The mean ages of men and women were 64.1 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD) and 64.2 ± 12.7 years, and mean weights were 63.0 ± 8.2 and 63.1 ± 8.2 kg, respectively. BMD was measured by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Sociodemographic characteristics and physical activities were investigated using a standard questionnaire delivered by face-to-face interview. BMDs were 0.48 ± 0.01 and 0.37 ± 0.11 g/cm2 in men and women, respectively. In men, age, weight, body mass index (BMI), LBM, FM, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, and education were significantly correlated with BMD. In women, age, weight, BMI, LBM, FM, education, years since menopause, number of deliveries, and number of children breast-fed were significantly correlated with BMD. By multiple regression, LBM, education, smoking, and alcohol in men, and age, LBM, FM, smoking, and number of delivery in women were independent determinants of BMD. LBM was an important contributor for BMD in men, but both LBM and FM were equally important contributors in female to BMD. This stems from the fact that body composition changes with age differ in men and women. Thus, the augmentation of muscle mass in men and the maintenance of an optimal weight in women act to prevent osteoporosis.

KW - Bone mineral density

KW - Fat mass

KW - Lean body mass

KW - Peripheral densitometry

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4344604515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bone.2004.05.016

DO - 10.1016/j.bone.2004.05.016

M3 - Article

C2 - 15336618

AN - SCOPUS:4344604515

VL - 35

SP - 792

EP - 798

JO - Bone

JF - Bone

SN - 8756-3282

IS - 3

ER -