Blood Pressure Variability and Incidence of New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

So Ryoung Lee, You Jung Choi, Eue Keun Choi, Kyung Do Han, Euijae Lee, Myung Jin Cha, Seil Oh, Gregory Y.H. Lip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Blood pressure variability is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but its association with atrial fibrillation (AF) is uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the association between visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and incident AF. This population-based cohort study used database from the Health Screening Cohort, which contained a complete set of medical claims and a biannual health checkup information of the Koran population. A total of 8 063 922 individuals who had at least 3 health checkups with blood pressure measurement between 2004 and 2010 were collected after excluding subjects with preexisting AF. Blood pressure variability was defined as variability independence of the mean and was divided into 4 quartiles. During a mean follow-up of 6.8 years, 140 086 subjects were newly diagnosed with AF. The highest blood pressure variability (fourth quartile) was associated with an increased risk of AF (hazard ratio, 95% CI; systolic blood pressure: 1.06, 1.05-1.08; diastolic blood pressure: 1.07, 1.05-1.08) compared with the lowest (first quartile). Among subjects in the fourth quartile in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability, the risk of AF was 7.6% higher than those in the first quartile. Moreover, this result was consistent in both patients with or without prevalent hypertension. In subgroup analysis, the impact of high blood pressure variability on AF development was stronger in high-risk subjects, who were older (≥65 years), with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Our findings demonstrated that higher blood pressure variability was associated with a modestly increased risk of AF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-315
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2020

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Atrial Fibrillation
Blood Pressure
Incidence
Population
Hypertension
Health
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Diabetes Mellitus
Cohort Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Databases

Keywords

  • atrial fibrillation
  • blood pressure
  • stroke
  • variability

Cite this

Lee, So Ryoung ; Choi, You Jung ; Choi, Eue Keun ; Han, Kyung Do ; Lee, Euijae ; Cha, Myung Jin ; Oh, Seil ; Lip, Gregory Y.H. / Blood Pressure Variability and Incidence of New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation : A Nationwide Population-Based Study. In: Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979). 2020 ; Vol. 75, No. 2. pp. 309-315.
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Blood Pressure Variability and Incidence of New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation : A Nationwide Population-Based Study. / Lee, So Ryoung; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Eue Keun; Han, Kyung Do; Lee, Euijae; Cha, Myung Jin; Oh, Seil; Lip, Gregory Y.H.

In: Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), Vol. 75, No. 2, 01.02.2020, p. 309-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lee, So Ryoung

AU - Choi, You Jung

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