Biology of melanogenesis and the search for hypopigmenting agents

Kyoung Chan Park, Sun Young Huh, Hye Ryung Choi, Dong Seok Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increased production and accumulation of melanin are characteristics of a large number of skin diseases, including melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and lentigo. A number of clinical agents can reduce normal or abnormal pigmentation, but none of these have achieved satisfactory effects. This review discusses the mechanisms behind the different approaches. Tyrosinase is a pivotal enzyme in melanin synthesis. The majority of whitening or lightening agents act by specifically reducing the activity of tyrosinase via several mechanisms: (1) prior to melanin synthesis (interfering with its transcription and/or glycosylation); (2) during melanin synthesis (tyrosinase inhibition, peroxidase inhibition and reduction of byproducts); and (3) after melanin synthesis (tyrosinase degradation, inhibition of melanosome transfer, acceleration of skin turnover). Additional melanogenesis-associated mechanisms are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-58
Number of pages6
JournalDermatologica Sinica
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Melanins
Monophenol Monooxygenase
Lentigo
Melanosomes
Melanosis
Hyperpigmentation
Pigmentation
Glycosylation
Skin Diseases
Peroxidase
Skin
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Mechanism
  • Melanin
  • Tyrosinase

Cite this

Park, Kyoung Chan ; Huh, Sun Young ; Choi, Hye Ryung ; Kim, Dong Seok. / Biology of melanogenesis and the search for hypopigmenting agents. In: Dermatologica Sinica. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 53-58.
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Biology of melanogenesis and the search for hypopigmenting agents. / Park, Kyoung Chan; Huh, Sun Young; Choi, Hye Ryung; Kim, Dong Seok.

In: Dermatologica Sinica, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.06.2010, p. 53-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Huh, Sun Young

AU - Choi, Hye Ryung

AU - Kim, Dong Seok

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AB - Increased production and accumulation of melanin are characteristics of a large number of skin diseases, including melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and lentigo. A number of clinical agents can reduce normal or abnormal pigmentation, but none of these have achieved satisfactory effects. This review discusses the mechanisms behind the different approaches. Tyrosinase is a pivotal enzyme in melanin synthesis. The majority of whitening or lightening agents act by specifically reducing the activity of tyrosinase via several mechanisms: (1) prior to melanin synthesis (interfering with its transcription and/or glycosylation); (2) during melanin synthesis (tyrosinase inhibition, peroxidase inhibition and reduction of byproducts); and (3) after melanin synthesis (tyrosinase degradation, inhibition of melanosome transfer, acceleration of skin turnover). Additional melanogenesis-associated mechanisms are also discussed.

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