Author Correction: Noninvasive Self-diagnostic Device for Tear Collection and Glucose Measurement (Scientific Reports, (2019), 9, 1, (4747), 10.1038/s41598-019-41066-8)

Seung Ho Lee, Yong Chan Cho, Young Bin Choy

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

This Article contains an error. The Authors missed out a previous study on a similar topic. The additional reference is listed below as reference 1, and should appear in the text as below. In the Discussion section, “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. However, to our knowledge, studies on devices for practical, self-diagnostic applications is scarce. In this context, a device allowing concurrent tear collection and glucose measurement could be useful and convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as a noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.” should read: “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. A previous paper by Kownacka et al.1 reported results of phase II clinical trial for a device for continuous glucose monitoring in tear fluid, which needs to reside at the preocular surface while being wired to the reader. However, a device allowing sampled tear collection and glucose measurement could be also useful and probably more convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of device contact for tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as an alternative noninvasive noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.”

Original languageEnglish
Article number12868
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

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Tears
Glucose
Equipment and Supplies
Blood Glucose
Phase II Clinical Trials

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@article{44e315e22d3246e19ea0548f11537ba4,
title = "Author Correction: Noninvasive Self-diagnostic Device for Tear Collection and Glucose Measurement (Scientific Reports, (2019), 9, 1, (4747), 10.1038/s41598-019-41066-8)",
abstract = "This Article contains an error. The Authors missed out a previous study on a similar topic. The additional reference is listed below as reference 1, and should appear in the text as below. In the Discussion section, “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. However, to our knowledge, studies on devices for practical, self-diagnostic applications is scarce. In this context, a device allowing concurrent tear collection and glucose measurement could be useful and convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as a noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.” should read: “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. A previous paper by Kownacka et al.1 reported results of phase II clinical trial for a device for continuous glucose monitoring in tear fluid, which needs to reside at the preocular surface while being wired to the reader. However, a device allowing sampled tear collection and glucose measurement could be also useful and probably more convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of device contact for tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as an alternative noninvasive noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.”",
author = "Lee, {Seung Ho} and Cho, {Yong Chan} and Choy, {Young Bin}",
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T1 - Author Correction

T2 - Noninvasive Self-diagnostic Device for Tear Collection and Glucose Measurement (Scientific Reports, (2019), 9, 1, (4747), 10.1038/s41598-019-41066-8)

AU - Lee, Seung Ho

AU - Cho, Yong Chan

AU - Choy, Young Bin

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - This Article contains an error. The Authors missed out a previous study on a similar topic. The additional reference is listed below as reference 1, and should appear in the text as below. In the Discussion section, “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. However, to our knowledge, studies on devices for practical, self-diagnostic applications is scarce. In this context, a device allowing concurrent tear collection and glucose measurement could be useful and convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as a noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.” should read: “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. A previous paper by Kownacka et al.1 reported results of phase II clinical trial for a device for continuous glucose monitoring in tear fluid, which needs to reside at the preocular surface while being wired to the reader. However, a device allowing sampled tear collection and glucose measurement could be also useful and probably more convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of device contact for tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as an alternative noninvasive noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.”

AB - This Article contains an error. The Authors missed out a previous study on a similar topic. The additional reference is listed below as reference 1, and should appear in the text as below. In the Discussion section, “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. However, to our knowledge, studies on devices for practical, self-diagnostic applications is scarce. In this context, a device allowing concurrent tear collection and glucose measurement could be useful and convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as a noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.” should read: “Tear glucose measurement has been suggested as a potential, noninvasive strategy of blood glucose prediction8,10,32. Most of the previous studies focused on developing sensors with a higher accuracy since the glucose concentration in tears is known to be lower than that in the blood13,33,34. A previous paper by Kownacka et al.1 reported results of phase II clinical trial for a device for continuous glucose monitoring in tear fluid, which needs to reside at the preocular surface while being wired to the reader. However, a device allowing sampled tear collection and glucose measurement could be also useful and probably more convenient for users. Such a device would be more advantageous if the measurement could be reliable even with a small quantity of tear fluid as this would allow for a short time of device contact for tear collection, hence less invasiveness on the preocular tissues. Therefore, we proposed the tear-glucose device herein as an alternative noninvasive noninvasive self-diagnostic tool for prediction of blood glucose levels.”

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