Associations of Blood Cadmium Levels with Depression and Lower Handgrip Strength in a Community-Dwelling Elderly Population: A Repeated-Measures Panel Study

Kyoung Nam Kim, Mee Ri Lee, Yoon Hyeong Choi, Bo Eun Lee, Yun-Chul Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although biologically plausible, few studies have linked cadmium exposure to depression or muscle strength. Herein, we hypothesized that blood cadmium concentrations are associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in a community-dwelling elderly population. Methods: Data from 983 elderly participants who completed up to 3 surveys between 2012 and 2015 were analyzed. At every survey, we assessed depressive status using the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (SGDS-K) and measured handgrip strength and blood cadmium levels (mean, 1.24 μg/L). We evaluated the associations of cadmium with depression using generalized linear mixed models, and handgrip strength using linear mixed models. All models were adjusted for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors including active and passive smoking, weight, height, and comorbidity status. Results: Interquartile-range increase (0.645 μg/L) in blood cadmium levels was associated with depression defined as SGDS-K score ≥8 (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.52) and lower handgrip strength (right hand: β = -0.40, 95% confidence interval: -0.75, -0.09; left hand: β = -0.36, 95% confidence interval: -0.69, -0.04). The association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength was robust after further adjustment for depressive status, although it attenuated in size by 14.7%-18.0%. Conclusions: After adjusting for potential confounders, blood cadmium concentrations were associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in an elderly population. The participants' depressive status partially mediated the association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1525-1530
Number of pages6
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume71
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2016

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Independent Living
Cadmium
Depression
Population
Confidence Intervals
Linear Models
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Muscle Strength
Hand Strength
Geriatrics
Life Style
Comorbidity
Hand
Odds Ratio
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Blood cadmium
  • Depression
  • Handgrip strength
  • Repeated-measures panel

Cite this

@article{3560ed61c9974608a4bdc64e231bffc3,
title = "Associations of Blood Cadmium Levels with Depression and Lower Handgrip Strength in a Community-Dwelling Elderly Population: A Repeated-Measures Panel Study",
abstract = "Background: Although biologically plausible, few studies have linked cadmium exposure to depression or muscle strength. Herein, we hypothesized that blood cadmium concentrations are associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in a community-dwelling elderly population. Methods: Data from 983 elderly participants who completed up to 3 surveys between 2012 and 2015 were analyzed. At every survey, we assessed depressive status using the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (SGDS-K) and measured handgrip strength and blood cadmium levels (mean, 1.24 μg/L). We evaluated the associations of cadmium with depression using generalized linear mixed models, and handgrip strength using linear mixed models. All models were adjusted for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors including active and passive smoking, weight, height, and comorbidity status. Results: Interquartile-range increase (0.645 μg/L) in blood cadmium levels was associated with depression defined as SGDS-K score ≥8 (odds ratio = 1.27, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.06, 1.52) and lower handgrip strength (right hand: β = -0.40, 95{\%} confidence interval: -0.75, -0.09; left hand: β = -0.36, 95{\%} confidence interval: -0.69, -0.04). The association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength was robust after further adjustment for depressive status, although it attenuated in size by 14.7{\%}-18.0{\%}. Conclusions: After adjusting for potential confounders, blood cadmium concentrations were associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in an elderly population. The participants' depressive status partially mediated the association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength.",
keywords = "Blood cadmium, Depression, Handgrip strength, Repeated-measures panel",
author = "Kim, {Kyoung Nam} and Lee, {Mee Ri} and Choi, {Yoon Hyeong} and Lee, {Bo Eun} and Yun-Chul Hong",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/gerona/glw119",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "1525--1530",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
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number = "11",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations of Blood Cadmium Levels with Depression and Lower Handgrip Strength in a Community-Dwelling Elderly Population

T2 - A Repeated-Measures Panel Study

AU - Kim, Kyoung Nam

AU - Lee, Mee Ri

AU - Choi, Yoon Hyeong

AU - Lee, Bo Eun

AU - Hong, Yun-Chul

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Background: Although biologically plausible, few studies have linked cadmium exposure to depression or muscle strength. Herein, we hypothesized that blood cadmium concentrations are associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in a community-dwelling elderly population. Methods: Data from 983 elderly participants who completed up to 3 surveys between 2012 and 2015 were analyzed. At every survey, we assessed depressive status using the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (SGDS-K) and measured handgrip strength and blood cadmium levels (mean, 1.24 μg/L). We evaluated the associations of cadmium with depression using generalized linear mixed models, and handgrip strength using linear mixed models. All models were adjusted for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors including active and passive smoking, weight, height, and comorbidity status. Results: Interquartile-range increase (0.645 μg/L) in blood cadmium levels was associated with depression defined as SGDS-K score ≥8 (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.52) and lower handgrip strength (right hand: β = -0.40, 95% confidence interval: -0.75, -0.09; left hand: β = -0.36, 95% confidence interval: -0.69, -0.04). The association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength was robust after further adjustment for depressive status, although it attenuated in size by 14.7%-18.0%. Conclusions: After adjusting for potential confounders, blood cadmium concentrations were associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in an elderly population. The participants' depressive status partially mediated the association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength.

AB - Background: Although biologically plausible, few studies have linked cadmium exposure to depression or muscle strength. Herein, we hypothesized that blood cadmium concentrations are associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in a community-dwelling elderly population. Methods: Data from 983 elderly participants who completed up to 3 surveys between 2012 and 2015 were analyzed. At every survey, we assessed depressive status using the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (SGDS-K) and measured handgrip strength and blood cadmium levels (mean, 1.24 μg/L). We evaluated the associations of cadmium with depression using generalized linear mixed models, and handgrip strength using linear mixed models. All models were adjusted for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors including active and passive smoking, weight, height, and comorbidity status. Results: Interquartile-range increase (0.645 μg/L) in blood cadmium levels was associated with depression defined as SGDS-K score ≥8 (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.52) and lower handgrip strength (right hand: β = -0.40, 95% confidence interval: -0.75, -0.09; left hand: β = -0.36, 95% confidence interval: -0.69, -0.04). The association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength was robust after further adjustment for depressive status, although it attenuated in size by 14.7%-18.0%. Conclusions: After adjusting for potential confounders, blood cadmium concentrations were associated with depression and lower handgrip strength in an elderly population. The participants' depressive status partially mediated the association between cadmium levels and handgrip strength.

KW - Blood cadmium

KW - Depression

KW - Handgrip strength

KW - Repeated-measures panel

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994438779&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/glw119

DO - 10.1093/gerona/glw119

M3 - Article

C2 - 27481883

AN - SCOPUS:84994438779

VL - 71

SP - 1525

EP - 1530

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 11

ER -