Associations between alcohol consumption and cardiovascular disease among long-term survivors of colorectal cancer: a population-based, retrospective cohort study

Gyeongsil Lee, Seogsong Jeong, Seulggie Choi, Kyae Hyung Kim, Jooyoung Chang, Seong Rae Kim, Kyuwoong Kim, Joung Sik Son, Sung Min Kim, Daein Choi, Sang Min Park

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Abstract

Background: There is no evidence whether it is best to stop drinking alcohol at all or whether it is okay to drink a little in that light-to-moderate alcohol use was associated with low cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to non-drinker among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, who are regarded as vulnerable to CVD. Therefore, we evaluated the association between alcohol consumption and incident CVD among long-term survivors of CRC. Methods: This population-based, retrospective cohort study utilized data from the Korean National Insurance Service of 20,653 long-term survivors of CRC diagnosed between 2006 and 2012. Participants were followed up to the date of CVD, death, or December 31, 2018. All patients were categorized according to their daily alcohol consumption (g/day). The outcomes were incident CVD, including ischemic heart disease (IHD) and ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards regression after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and history of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Results: There was no association between alcohol consumption and incident CVD among long-term survivors of CRC. Additionally, hazardous alcohol consumption (≥ 40 g/day in male patients and ≥ 20 g/day in female patients) was associated with increased CVD, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.51 [1.15–1.97], 1.60 [1.03–2.48], and 2.65 [1.25–5.62], respectively) compared with non-drinkers. Conclusion: No discernable protective association was found between alcohol consumption and incident CVD for even light-to-moderate drinking among long-term survivors of CRC. Alcohol consumption ≥40 g/day in male patients and ≥ 20 g/day in female patients was associated with an increased risk of stroke compared with non-drinkers. These novel results provide useful evidence when advising survivors of CRC regarding alcohol use.

Original languageEnglish
Article number710
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Alcohol consumption
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Colorectal cancer

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