Association between sedative-hypnotic medication use and incidence of cancer in Korean Nation Health Insurance Service data

Sun Jae Jung, Joonki Lee, Jae Won Choi, Soohyun Kim, Aesun Shin, Yu Jin Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between the use of various sedative-hypnotics and the incidence of overall and individual cancers in a large, population-based, retrospective cohort study. Methods: We selected a 5% random sample of individuals aged 50 years or older from data maintained by the Korean National Health Insurance Service for the years 2002–2015, excluding individuals with a prior diagnosis of cancer and with any sedative-hypnotic use in the initial two years of follow-up, leaving 236,759 participants for the final analysis. Exposure to sedative-hypnotics was defined by type of drug, standardized to a defined daily dose, and coded as a time-varying variable. Cox proportional hazard models were applied after adjusting for sex, socio-economic status, and comorbidities. Results: We observed increased risk for overall cancer among men and women who used sedative-hypnotics (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–1.13 for men; HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.09–1.25 for women) compared with non-users after full adjustment. In the fully adjusted model, women with any sedative-hypnotic use had significantly increased risk for thyroid (HR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.24–1.87), breast (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.04–1.61), ovarian (HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.10–2.46), and lung cancer (HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.17–1.69) compared with non-users. Men with sedative-hypnotic use had increased risk for prostate (HR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.16–1.58), brain (HR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.04–2.69), and lung cancer (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.07–1.35) compared with non-users. Conclusion: We found a significant increase in overall cancer incidence among participants who used sedative-hypnotics, and both male and female sedative-hypnotic users had significantly increased risk for certain types of cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume60
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Health Insurance
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Health Services
Confidence Intervals
Incidence
Neoplasms
National Health Programs
Lung Neoplasms
Proportional Hazards Models
Comorbidity
Prostate
Thyroid Gland
Breast
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Economics
Brain
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Hypnotic
  • Incidence
  • Sedative

Cite this

Jung, Sun Jae ; Lee, Joonki ; Choi, Jae Won ; Kim, Soohyun ; Shin, Aesun ; Lee, Yu Jin. / Association between sedative-hypnotic medication use and incidence of cancer in Korean Nation Health Insurance Service data. In: Sleep Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 60. pp. 159-164.
@article{f3eb8212dcbe4730918f82108e367d3e,
title = "Association between sedative-hypnotic medication use and incidence of cancer in Korean Nation Health Insurance Service data",
abstract = "Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between the use of various sedative-hypnotics and the incidence of overall and individual cancers in a large, population-based, retrospective cohort study. Methods: We selected a 5{\%} random sample of individuals aged 50 years or older from data maintained by the Korean National Health Insurance Service for the years 2002–2015, excluding individuals with a prior diagnosis of cancer and with any sedative-hypnotic use in the initial two years of follow-up, leaving 236,759 participants for the final analysis. Exposure to sedative-hypnotics was defined by type of drug, standardized to a defined daily dose, and coded as a time-varying variable. Cox proportional hazard models were applied after adjusting for sex, socio-economic status, and comorbidities. Results: We observed increased risk for overall cancer among men and women who used sedative-hypnotics (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.07, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–1.13 for men; HR = 1.21, 95{\%} CI = 1.09–1.25 for women) compared with non-users after full adjustment. In the fully adjusted model, women with any sedative-hypnotic use had significantly increased risk for thyroid (HR = 1.53, 95{\%} CI = 1.24–1.87), breast (HR = 1.29, 95{\%} CI = 1.04–1.61), ovarian (HR = 1.65, 95{\%} CI = 1.10–2.46), and lung cancer (HR = 1.40, 95{\%} CI = 1.17–1.69) compared with non-users. Men with sedative-hypnotic use had increased risk for prostate (HR = 1.36, 95{\%} CI = 1.16–1.58), brain (HR = 1.67, 95{\%} CI = 1.04–2.69), and lung cancer (HR = 1.20, 95{\%} CI = 1.07–1.35) compared with non-users. Conclusion: We found a significant increase in overall cancer incidence among participants who used sedative-hypnotics, and both male and female sedative-hypnotic users had significantly increased risk for certain types of cancer.",
keywords = "Cancer, Hypnotic, Incidence, Sedative",
author = "Jung, {Sun Jae} and Joonki Lee and Choi, {Jae Won} and Soohyun Kim and Aesun Shin and Lee, {Yu Jin}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.sleep.2019.03.018",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "159--164",
journal = "Sleep medicine",
issn = "1389-9457",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Association between sedative-hypnotic medication use and incidence of cancer in Korean Nation Health Insurance Service data. / Jung, Sun Jae; Lee, Joonki; Choi, Jae Won; Kim, Soohyun; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Yu Jin.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 60, 01.08.2019, p. 159-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between sedative-hypnotic medication use and incidence of cancer in Korean Nation Health Insurance Service data

AU - Jung, Sun Jae

AU - Lee, Joonki

AU - Choi, Jae Won

AU - Kim, Soohyun

AU - Shin, Aesun

AU - Lee, Yu Jin

PY - 2019/8/1

Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between the use of various sedative-hypnotics and the incidence of overall and individual cancers in a large, population-based, retrospective cohort study. Methods: We selected a 5% random sample of individuals aged 50 years or older from data maintained by the Korean National Health Insurance Service for the years 2002–2015, excluding individuals with a prior diagnosis of cancer and with any sedative-hypnotic use in the initial two years of follow-up, leaving 236,759 participants for the final analysis. Exposure to sedative-hypnotics was defined by type of drug, standardized to a defined daily dose, and coded as a time-varying variable. Cox proportional hazard models were applied after adjusting for sex, socio-economic status, and comorbidities. Results: We observed increased risk for overall cancer among men and women who used sedative-hypnotics (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–1.13 for men; HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.09–1.25 for women) compared with non-users after full adjustment. In the fully adjusted model, women with any sedative-hypnotic use had significantly increased risk for thyroid (HR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.24–1.87), breast (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.04–1.61), ovarian (HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.10–2.46), and lung cancer (HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.17–1.69) compared with non-users. Men with sedative-hypnotic use had increased risk for prostate (HR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.16–1.58), brain (HR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.04–2.69), and lung cancer (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.07–1.35) compared with non-users. Conclusion: We found a significant increase in overall cancer incidence among participants who used sedative-hypnotics, and both male and female sedative-hypnotic users had significantly increased risk for certain types of cancer.

AB - Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between the use of various sedative-hypnotics and the incidence of overall and individual cancers in a large, population-based, retrospective cohort study. Methods: We selected a 5% random sample of individuals aged 50 years or older from data maintained by the Korean National Health Insurance Service for the years 2002–2015, excluding individuals with a prior diagnosis of cancer and with any sedative-hypnotic use in the initial two years of follow-up, leaving 236,759 participants for the final analysis. Exposure to sedative-hypnotics was defined by type of drug, standardized to a defined daily dose, and coded as a time-varying variable. Cox proportional hazard models were applied after adjusting for sex, socio-economic status, and comorbidities. Results: We observed increased risk for overall cancer among men and women who used sedative-hypnotics (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–1.13 for men; HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.09–1.25 for women) compared with non-users after full adjustment. In the fully adjusted model, women with any sedative-hypnotic use had significantly increased risk for thyroid (HR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.24–1.87), breast (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.04–1.61), ovarian (HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.10–2.46), and lung cancer (HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.17–1.69) compared with non-users. Men with sedative-hypnotic use had increased risk for prostate (HR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.16–1.58), brain (HR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.04–2.69), and lung cancer (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.07–1.35) compared with non-users. Conclusion: We found a significant increase in overall cancer incidence among participants who used sedative-hypnotics, and both male and female sedative-hypnotic users had significantly increased risk for certain types of cancer.

KW - Cancer

KW - Hypnotic

KW - Incidence

KW - Sedative

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067084479&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.sleep.2019.03.018

DO - 10.1016/j.sleep.2019.03.018

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 159

EP - 164

JO - Sleep medicine

JF - Sleep medicine

SN - 1389-9457

ER -