Association between morningness-eveningness, sleep duration, weekend catch-up sleep and depression among Korean high-school students

Dae Lim Koo, Kwang Ik Yang, Jee Hyun Kim, Daeyoung Kim, Jun Sang Sunwoo, Young Hwangbo, Hwa Reung Lee, Seung Bong Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study aimed to examine the association between morningness-eveningness preferences, sleep duration, weekend catch-up sleep duration and depression among Korean high-school students. A total of 8,655 high-school students participated from 15 districts in South Korea and completed an online self-report questionnaire. The following sleep characteristics were assessed: weekday and weekend sleep duration, weekend catch-up sleep duration, morningness-eveningness preference, perceived sufficiency of sleep, self-reported snoring and sleep apnea, daytime sleepiness, and sleep environment. Age, gender, body mass index, number of private classes, proneness to internet addiction, and depressive mood were also evaluated. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to compute odds ratios for the association between depression and sleep characteristics, after controlling for relevant covariates. Eveningness preference was a significant predictor of depressive mood (adjusted OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.47–1.99). Weekend CUS durations that were ≥2 hr and enrollment in numerous private classes were associated with a lower risk for depression (0.68, 0.55–0.85; 0.76, 0.60–0.95; respectively). Female gender, underweight and obese body weight, short weekday sleep durations, excessive daytime sleepiness, perceived excessiveness and insufficiency of sleep, self-reported snoring and sleep apnea, proneness to internet addiction and a non-optimal sleep environment were associated with an increased risk for depression. Eveningness preference and insufficient weekday sleep duration were associated with an increased risk for depression. Weekend CUS duration ≥2 hr reduced the risk for depression. Diverse aspects, including sleeping habits and sleep-related environmental factors, should be considered to reduce depressive symptoms in late adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13063
JournalJournal of Sleep Research
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • depression
  • morningness-eveningness preference
  • sleep

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