Association between lipoprotein cholesterol and future cardiovascular disease and mortality in older adults: a Korean nationwide longitudinal study

Seung Hee Kim, Ki Young Son

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Dyslipidemia is considered an independent health risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a leading cause of mortality in older adults. Despite its importance, there have been few reports on the association between lipoprotein cholesterol and future CVD and cardiovascular (CV) mortality among elderly Asians aged ≥ 65 years. This study investigated the association between lipoprotein cholesterol and future CVD and CV mortality in an elderly Korean population using a large nationwide sample. Methods: From the cohort database of the Korean National Health Insurance Service, 62,604 adults aged ≥ 65 years (32,584 men and 30,020 women) were included. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were categorized by quartiles. Cox proportional hazard models and linear regression analyses were used to assess the association between the quartiles of lipoprotein cholesterol and future CV events or mortality. Results: The mean follow-up period was 3.3 years. The incidence rates of ischemic heart disease and ischemic brain disease were 0.97 and 0.61 per 1,000 person-years, respectively, and the mortality rates from these diseases were 0.22 and 0.34 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In a completely adjusted model, high HDL-C and LDL-C levels were not associated with total CV events and CVD mortality. However, high LDL-C levels were significantly associated with a lower incidence of ischemic brain disease. Furthermore, diabetic patients with high LDL-C levels were more likely to have higher CV mortality, whereas non-smokers with high LDL-C levels were less likely to be at risk of CV events. Conclusions: Neither high LDL-C nor HDL-C levels were significantly associated with future CV mortality in older adults aged ≥ 65 years. High LDL-C levels do not seem to be a risk factor for CVD in elderly individuals, and further studies are required.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3
JournalLipids in Health and Disease
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Elderly
  • Incidence
  • Lipoprotein cholesterol
  • Mortality
  • Relationship
  • Risk factor

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