Association between anxiety and depression and gastroesophageal reflux disease

Results from a large cross-sectional study

Ji Min Choi, Jong In Yang, Seung Joo Kang, Yoo Min Han, Jooyoung Lee, Changhyun Lee, Su Jin Chung, Dae Hyun Yoon, Boram Park, Yong Sung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background/Aims: The different clinical manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be influenced by associated psychological factors. We evaluated the psychological status (anxiety and depression) according to each subtype of GERD. Methods: Subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and completed a symptom questionnaire between January 2008 and December 2011 were analyzed. The subjects were classified into the following groups: erosive reflux disease (ERD), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), asymptomatic erosive esophagitis (AEE), and controls. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Results: We analyzed 19 099 subjects: 16 157 (84.6%), 176 (0.9%), 1398 (7.3%), and 1368 (7.2%) in the control, ERD, NERD, and AEE groups, respectively. Multiple multinomial logistic regression revealed a significant association of increased state (adjusted OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.53-2.33) and trait anxiety (adjusted OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.34-2.35) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.75-2.80) with NERD. ERD group showed a significant association only with state anxiety (adjusted OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.27-3.81) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.18-4.22). The AEE group, however, did not show any significant association with psychological factors. Conclusion: This cross-sectional study revealed that anxiety and depression levels were significantly higher in subjects with GERD (notably in the NERD) than in controls.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)593-602
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2018

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Gastroesophageal Reflux
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Esophagitis
Asymptomatic Diseases
Psychology
Digestive System Endoscopy
Equipment and Supplies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Association between anxiety and depression and gastroesophageal reflux disease: Results from a large cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background/Aims: The different clinical manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be influenced by associated psychological factors. We evaluated the psychological status (anxiety and depression) according to each subtype of GERD. Methods: Subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and completed a symptom questionnaire between January 2008 and December 2011 were analyzed. The subjects were classified into the following groups: erosive reflux disease (ERD), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), asymptomatic erosive esophagitis (AEE), and controls. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Results: We analyzed 19 099 subjects: 16 157 (84.6{\%}), 176 (0.9{\%}), 1398 (7.3{\%}), and 1368 (7.2{\%}) in the control, ERD, NERD, and AEE groups, respectively. Multiple multinomial logistic regression revealed a significant association of increased state (adjusted OR, 1.89; 95{\%} CI, 1.53-2.33) and trait anxiety (adjusted OR, 1.78; 95{\%} CI, 1.34-2.35) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.21; 95{\%} CI, 1.75-2.80) with NERD. ERD group showed a significant association only with state anxiety (adjusted OR, 2.20; 95{\%} CI, 1.27-3.81) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.23; 95{\%} CI, 1.18-4.22). The AEE group, however, did not show any significant association with psychological factors. Conclusion: This cross-sectional study revealed that anxiety and depression levels were significantly higher in subjects with GERD (notably in the NERD) than in controls.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Depression, Gastroesophageal reflux, Psychology",
author = "Choi, {Ji Min} and Yang, {Jong In} and Kang, {Seung Joo} and Han, {Yoo Min} and Jooyoung Lee and Changhyun Lee and Chung, {Su Jin} and Yoon, {Dae Hyun} and Boram Park and Kim, {Yong Sung}",
year = "2018",
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language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "593--602",
journal = "Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility",
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Association between anxiety and depression and gastroesophageal reflux disease : Results from a large cross-sectional study. / Choi, Ji Min; Yang, Jong In; Kang, Seung Joo; Han, Yoo Min; Lee, Jooyoung; Lee, Changhyun; Chung, Su Jin; Yoon, Dae Hyun; Park, Boram; Kim, Yong Sung.

In: Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.10.2018, p. 593-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between anxiety and depression and gastroesophageal reflux disease

T2 - Results from a large cross-sectional study

AU - Choi, Ji Min

AU - Yang, Jong In

AU - Kang, Seung Joo

AU - Han, Yoo Min

AU - Lee, Jooyoung

AU - Lee, Changhyun

AU - Chung, Su Jin

AU - Yoon, Dae Hyun

AU - Park, Boram

AU - Kim, Yong Sung

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Background/Aims: The different clinical manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be influenced by associated psychological factors. We evaluated the psychological status (anxiety and depression) according to each subtype of GERD. Methods: Subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and completed a symptom questionnaire between January 2008 and December 2011 were analyzed. The subjects were classified into the following groups: erosive reflux disease (ERD), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), asymptomatic erosive esophagitis (AEE), and controls. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Results: We analyzed 19 099 subjects: 16 157 (84.6%), 176 (0.9%), 1398 (7.3%), and 1368 (7.2%) in the control, ERD, NERD, and AEE groups, respectively. Multiple multinomial logistic regression revealed a significant association of increased state (adjusted OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.53-2.33) and trait anxiety (adjusted OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.34-2.35) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.75-2.80) with NERD. ERD group showed a significant association only with state anxiety (adjusted OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.27-3.81) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.18-4.22). The AEE group, however, did not show any significant association with psychological factors. Conclusion: This cross-sectional study revealed that anxiety and depression levels were significantly higher in subjects with GERD (notably in the NERD) than in controls.

AB - Background/Aims: The different clinical manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be influenced by associated psychological factors. We evaluated the psychological status (anxiety and depression) according to each subtype of GERD. Methods: Subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and completed a symptom questionnaire between January 2008 and December 2011 were analyzed. The subjects were classified into the following groups: erosive reflux disease (ERD), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), asymptomatic erosive esophagitis (AEE), and controls. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Results: We analyzed 19 099 subjects: 16 157 (84.6%), 176 (0.9%), 1398 (7.3%), and 1368 (7.2%) in the control, ERD, NERD, and AEE groups, respectively. Multiple multinomial logistic regression revealed a significant association of increased state (adjusted OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.53-2.33) and trait anxiety (adjusted OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.34-2.35) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.75-2.80) with NERD. ERD group showed a significant association only with state anxiety (adjusted OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.27-3.81) and depression (adjusted OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.18-4.22). The AEE group, however, did not show any significant association with psychological factors. Conclusion: This cross-sectional study revealed that anxiety and depression levels were significantly higher in subjects with GERD (notably in the NERD) than in controls.

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KW - Depression

KW - Gastroesophageal reflux

KW - Psychology

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