Acute gastric dilatation in rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) monkeys

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute gastric dilatation (AGD), one of the common causes of emergency occurs in macaca monkeys that are accommodated as laboratory-housed nonhuman primates. This report introduces some cases of occurrence in raising primates. The primates revealed an acute gastric dilatation, including the histories that were trained by monkey chair, anesthetized for the study or intact case. The clinical signs were comatose condition with sever abdominal distension, dehydration, cyanosis and apnea. One case died by deterioration of systemic body condition and performed necropsy. The other cases recovered from the AGD by the emergency treatment using the gastric tube and fluid therapy. Necropsy revealed the huge stomach filled with water, gas and ingesta. This report suggests that etiologic factors of AGD may include non-specific factors like these cases, with special emphasis on the incidence and management of AGD in nonhuman primates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-316
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Veterinary Clinics
Volume25
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Gastric Dilatation
Macaca fascicularis
Macaca mulatta
Haplorhini
monkeys
stomach
Primates
Stomach
Cyanosis
necropsy
Emergency Treatment
Fluid Therapy
Macaca
Apnea
Coma
Dehydration
apnea
fluid therapy
Emergencies
Gases

Keywords

  • Acute gastric dilatation
  • Emergency
  • Gastric tube
  • Nonhuman primate

Cite this

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Acute gastric dilatation in rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) monkeys. / Lee, Jae-Il; Kang, Byeong Cheol.

In: Journal of Veterinary Clinics, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.08.2008, p. 314-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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