A multidisciplinary approach for improving the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in South Korea

Gi Woon Kim, Dong Keon Lee, Bo Ra Kang, Won Jung Jeong, Choung Ah Lee, Young Taeck Oh, Yu Jin Kim, Seung Min Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIM: Direct medical control using video conferencing capabilities of smartphones has never been conducted in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. This study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and treatment effectiveness of real-time smartphone video conferencing calls for the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: This study was a pre-post-intervention prospective cohort study conducted from January 2013 to July 2015. The intervention was pre-hospital advanced life support under a physician's direction using a smartphone video call. RESULTS: In total, 942 cardiac arrests occurred over the 2-year period; 308 patients were excluded, and 314 (49.5%) and 320 (50.5%) cardiac arrest patients were enrolled during the pre- and post-intervention study periods, respectively. There were 248/320 (77.5%) cases of smartphone video-assisted advanced life support during the post-intervention period. For patients in the pre- and post-intervention groups, the pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation was 6.7 and 20%, respectively (adjusted odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.6-6.8, P < 0.01), and favourable neurological outcomes were ascertained in 1.9 and 6.9%, respectively (adjusted odds ratio 23.6, 95% confidence interval 3.4-164.0, P < 0.01). The smartphone voice and video quality were rated 8.5 and 8.2 out of 10, respectively, in physician evaluation, while the overall utility was rated 9.1. CONCLUSION: We concluded that a multidisciplinary approach including the re-education of basic life support, simulation training for advanced life support, real-time medical direction via video call, and dispatching two teams rather than one team improved the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-53
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2020

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Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Republic of Korea
Heart Arrest
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Voice Quality
Physicians
Cohort Studies
Smartphone
Prospective Studies
Education

Cite this

Kim, Gi Woon ; Lee, Dong Keon ; Kang, Bo Ra ; Jeong, Won Jung ; Lee, Choung Ah ; Oh, Young Taeck ; Kim, Yu Jin ; Park, Seung Min. / A multidisciplinary approach for improving the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in South Korea. In: European journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine. 2020 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 46-53.
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abstract = "AIM: Direct medical control using video conferencing capabilities of smartphones has never been conducted in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. This study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and treatment effectiveness of real-time smartphone video conferencing calls for the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: This study was a pre-post-intervention prospective cohort study conducted from January 2013 to July 2015. The intervention was pre-hospital advanced life support under a physician's direction using a smartphone video call. RESULTS: In total, 942 cardiac arrests occurred over the 2-year period; 308 patients were excluded, and 314 (49.5{\%}) and 320 (50.5{\%}) cardiac arrest patients were enrolled during the pre- and post-intervention study periods, respectively. There were 248/320 (77.5{\%}) cases of smartphone video-assisted advanced life support during the post-intervention period. For patients in the pre- and post-intervention groups, the pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation was 6.7 and 20{\%}, respectively (adjusted odds ratio 3.3, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.6-6.8, P < 0.01), and favourable neurological outcomes were ascertained in 1.9 and 6.9{\%}, respectively (adjusted odds ratio 23.6, 95{\%} confidence interval 3.4-164.0, P < 0.01). The smartphone voice and video quality were rated 8.5 and 8.2 out of 10, respectively, in physician evaluation, while the overall utility was rated 9.1. CONCLUSION: We concluded that a multidisciplinary approach including the re-education of basic life support, simulation training for advanced life support, real-time medical direction via video call, and dispatching two teams rather than one team improved the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.",
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A multidisciplinary approach for improving the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in South Korea. / Kim, Gi Woon; Lee, Dong Keon; Kang, Bo Ra; Jeong, Won Jung; Lee, Choung Ah; Oh, Young Taeck; Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Seung Min.

In: European journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.02.2020, p. 46-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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