A case of dermatomyositis in a patient with central core disease: unusual association with autoimmunity and genetic muscle disease

Min Jung Kim, Mi Hyeon Kim, Sung Hye Park, Yeong Wook Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Dermatomyositis is an inflammatory muscle disease caused by immune-mediated muscle injury, and central core disease (CCD) is a congenital myopathy associated with disturbed intracellular calcium homeostasis and excitation-contraction coupling. To date, CCD has not been reported to have autoantibodies or coexist with inflammatory myopathy. Case presentation: Here, we described the case of a 25-year-old woman who had progressive proximal muscle weakness, myalgia, pruritic macular rash, skin ulcers, and calcinosis. Dermatomyositis was initially suspected based on the clinical symptoms accompanied by elevated muscle enzyme levels, electromyography abnormalities, and a positive antinuclear antibody test. However, the patient’s muscle biopsy revealed the characteristic findings of both dermatomyositis and CCD, suggesting that dermatomyositis occurred in this patient with previously asymptomatic CCD. The patient did not have any pathogenic gene mutations associated with congenital myopathy, including RYR1 and SEPN1 in targeted next-generation sequencing. She received high-dose glucocorticoid therapy and azathioprine with a significant improvement in muscle strength. Conclusions: We present a case of rare coexistence of dermatomyositis and CCD. Clinicians should be aware that patients with CCD may have inflammatory myopathy that responds well to immunosuppressive therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100
JournalPediatric Rheumatology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Central core disease
  • Congenital myopathy
  • Dermatomyositis

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